MAR 14, 2020 5:45 PM PDT

Mass Cytometry Can Bring New Cancer Therapeutics

WRITTEN BY: Nouran Amin

New technology may soon accelerate cancer therapeutic development. The revolutionary technique is called mass cytometry (also referred to as CyTOF) and can reveal the inner workings of individual cancer cells. The technology can help identify different cancer markers that respond to diverse anti-cancer medications—suggesting new treatment combinations.

Learn more about cancer cells:

"We wanted to better understand the molecular differences between individual cancer cells so we could discover how these differences impact the cancer's response to therapies -- for example, whether some cells are more resistant than other anti-cancer drugs," Dr. Charis Teh , one of the study lead authors. "We decided that a new technology, called mass cytometry, would be an ideal approach to address this question."

CyTOF was demonstrated on blood cancer cells taken from myeloma patients samples and revealed the suitability of some ‘biomarkers’ in treating patients most effectively.

"The system we developed simultaneously and precisely measures 26 separate proteins in a blood cancer cell line derived from myeloma -- an incurable cancer of immune B cells," Dr Teh said. "We focused on understanding why some cells are sensitive to anti-cancer agents, while others are resistant.

Researchers found a protein-- MCL-1—that can prevent cell death and is believed to be a key factor for determining whether cells have lived or died when exposed to certain drugs like dexamethasone or bortezomib.

"Excitingly, there are already drugs in clinical trials that inhibit MCL-1 -- and when we tested these against myeloma cells, we found the MCL-1 inhibitor made the cells more sensitive to dexamethasone. This was even the case in myeloma samples taken from a patient -- our system had identified a potential new therapeutic approach for myeloma," Dr Teh said.

Source: Science Daily

About the Author
  • Nouran earned her BS and MS in Biology at IUPUI and currently shares her love of science by teaching. She enjoys writing on various topics as well including science & medicine, global health, and conservation biology. She hopes through her writing she can make science more engaging and communicable to the general public.
You May Also Like
JUN 08, 2020
Technology
Are Telepresence Robots in Our Near Future?
JUN 08, 2020
Are Telepresence Robots in Our Near Future?
A new research study carried out by Oregon State University discusses how telepresent robots help university students le ...
JUN 10, 2020
Neuroscience
Monkeys More Responsive to Hyper-Realistic Animations of Monkeys
JUN 10, 2020
Monkeys More Responsive to Hyper-Realistic Animations of Monkeys
Video:  More about Uncanny Valley Syndrome from MOCH it.   Rhesus macaques are a species of monkey often used ...
JUL 02, 2020
Chemistry & Physics
Carbon Nanolattices: Lighter Than (Atomic) Feathers, Tougher Than Diamonds
JUL 02, 2020
Carbon Nanolattices: Lighter Than (Atomic) Feathers, Tougher Than Diamonds
Carbon is known for its plentiful allotropes, such as the naturally existing graphite and diamond, as well as synthetic ...
JUL 05, 2020
Technology
Computational Model Predicts Speech
JUL 05, 2020
Computational Model Predicts Speech
Our brains analyze spoken language by predicting syllables. As such, this inspired researchers at the University of Gene ...
AUG 16, 2020
Technology
An Online Calculator Can Predict Your Stroke Risk
AUG 16, 2020
An Online Calculator Can Predict Your Stroke Risk
Clinicians can make an educated prediction on a patient's risk to a stroke based on the severity of their metabolic ...
SEP 02, 2020
Technology
Electronic Media Use Linked to Lower Academic Performance
SEP 02, 2020
Electronic Media Use Linked to Lower Academic Performance
A recent study revealed that heavy electronic media use is linked to lower academic performance in children 8- to 11-yea ...
Loading Comments...