JUN 05, 2020 7:52 PM PDT

Nature-Inspired Nanotech

WRITTEN BY: Nouran Amin

Wouldn’t it be nice to have natural-looking images from digital displays? Apparently, yes!

A study at the University of Central Florida has taken nature's nanotech to portray the beautiful colors of a butterfly’s wings.

"This display is more of a natural look than your current computer or smartphone screens," said Debashis Chanda, an associate professor in UCF's NanoScience Technology Center and principal investigator of the research. "It is like seeing a portrait on the wall at your house. It doesn't have that glare or extra light. It is more like looking at the natural world."

The ultra-high definition of the technology makes it easy on the eyes by using digital displays that are well lit by surrounding light giving it a more natural appearance.

"It'll be a step up for people to get used to it," he said. "But this is a way to create displays that are harmonious with how nature displays color and as a result look more natural and don't pump out a huge quantity of light into your eyes."

Findings were published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences and describes how the new technology counteracts current technologies that rely on energy-intensive bright lights stationed behind a screen. For example, current technologies (such as our TV screens) rely on liquid crystal displays (LCD), watch the video below to learn more:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VbdhbyiHX-s

"If we see butterflies, octopuses or many beautiful birds, their color actually originates from nanoscale structures on their feathers, skin or scales," Chanda said. "The protein molecule, the base element, they don't have their own color but when you put them together in an orderly, controlled fashion, it creates all kinds of color. What the butterfly does is simply scatter light back in a way that it creates all this beautiful color without absorbing anything."

Source: Science Daily

About the Author
  • Nouran is a scientist, educator, and life-long learner with a passion for making science more communicable. When not busy in the lab isolating blood macrophages, she enjoys writing on various STEM topics.
You May Also Like
MAR 23, 2021
Technology
Has COVD-19 Made Us Nicer To Machines?
MAR 23, 2021
Has COVD-19 Made Us Nicer To Machines?
Has COVID-19 made us nicer to machines? Research shows that individuals affected by the COVID-19 pandemic have shown mor ...
APR 15, 2021
Technology
New Technique for Creating Nanofibers Could Help Produce Affordable, Effective Mask Filters to Combat COVID-19
APR 15, 2021
New Technique for Creating Nanofibers Could Help Produce Affordable, Effective Mask Filters to Combat COVID-19
Recently, nanofibers have been used to improve the filtration quality of protective face masks and help them filter airb ...
JUN 08, 2021
Space & Astronomy
Improving the Accuracy of Space Weather Predictions
JUN 08, 2021
Improving the Accuracy of Space Weather Predictions
When magnetized plasma is released from the surface of the sun in a phenomenon known as coronal mass ejections, they can ...
JUN 16, 2021
Technology
Online App Increases Health Literacy and Reduces Vaccine Hesitancy in Incarcerated Women
JUN 16, 2021
Online App Increases Health Literacy and Reduces Vaccine Hesitancy in Incarcerated Women
Many women released from prison are returning to communities hit hard by the COVID-19 pandemic, communities that also fa ...
JUN 28, 2021
Cardiology
The Electricity of a Beating Heart is Caught on Graphene Camera
JUN 28, 2021
The Electricity of a Beating Heart is Caught on Graphene Camera
When graphene was first developed, it was hailed as a revolutionary material but its potential uses seemed unclear to ma ...
JUL 11, 2021
Earth & The Environment
A Lake in Antarctica Suddenly Drains
JUL 11, 2021
A Lake in Antarctica Suddenly Drains
During the winter of 2019, a large and deep lake on the Amery Ice Shelf in East Antarctica was lost in about a week. Abo ...
Loading Comments...