DEC 24, 2020 9:12 PM PST

Computational Tool Advances Cell Imaging

WRITTEN BY: Nouran Amin

Researchers at City University of Hong Kong (CityU) have developed a novel computational tool that can construct three-dimensional (3D) shapes and temporal changes of cells.

"It is a powerful computational tool that can segment and analyse cell images systematically at the single-cell level, which is much needed for the study of cell division, and cell and gene functions," described Professor Yan Hong, Chair Professor of Computer Engineering and Wong Chung Hong Professor of Data Engineering in the Department of Electrical Engineering (EE).

The tool is called "CShaper” and will help biologists revolutionize the way they analyze image data—particularly for imaging of cancer cells.

"Using CShaper, biologists can decipher the contents of these images within a few hours. It can characterise cell shapes and surface structures, and provide 3D views of cells at different time points," said Cao Jianfeng, a PhD student in Professor Yan's group, and a co-first author of the paper.

Learn more about biological imaging:

Findings were published in the scientific journal Nature Communications in the article titled "Establishment of a morphological atlas of the Caenorhabditis elegans embryo using deep-learning-based 4D segmentation."

"With estimated 20,000 genes in C. elegans, it means nearly 20,000 experiments would be needed if knocking out one gene at a time. And there would be an enormous amount of data. So it is essential to use an automated image analysis system. And this drives us to develop a more efficient one," says Professor Yan.

"To the best of our knowledge, CShaper is the first computational system for segmenting and analysing the images of C. elegans embryo systematically at the single-cell level," said Mr Cao. "Through close collaborations with biologists, we proudly developed a useful computer tool for automated analysis of a massive amount of cell image data. We believe it can promote further studies in developmental and cell biology, in particular in understanding the origination and growth of cancer cells," Professor Yan added.

Source: Science Daily

About the Author
  • Nouran is a scientist, educator, and life-long learner with a passion for making science more communicable. When not busy in the lab isolating blood macrophages, she enjoys writing on various STEM topics.
You May Also Like
AUG 18, 2021
Technology
Tracking System Maps How Cancer Cells Evolve, Providing New Treatment Insights
AUG 18, 2021
Tracking System Maps How Cancer Cells Evolve, Providing New Treatment Insights
All cells in a tumor share some genetic similarities, but also have key differences, often hindering effective treatment ...
AUG 29, 2021
Cancer
Researchers Bioprint Deadly Brain Tumor with 3D Printer
AUG 29, 2021
Researchers Bioprint Deadly Brain Tumor with 3D Printer
Researchers have managed to print an entire active and viable glioblastoma tumor- the deadliest form of brain cancer- us ...
SEP 14, 2021
Clinical & Molecular DX
HIV Self-Test App Proves Promising
SEP 14, 2021
HIV Self-Test App Proves Promising
A new app allows users to self-test for HIV, which has proven to help positive patients get access to medical care and c ...
SEP 22, 2021
Chemistry & Physics
Commercial Fusion Energy Could be Within Reach, Thanks to the World's Most Powerful Magnet
SEP 22, 2021
Commercial Fusion Energy Could be Within Reach, Thanks to the World's Most Powerful Magnet
Commonwealth Fusion Systems (CFS) announced this month that their new magnet might be the breakthrough needed to make fu ...
SEP 27, 2021
Earth & The Environment
Nudging Closer to a Sustainable Future
SEP 27, 2021
Nudging Closer to a Sustainable Future
Attitudes toward sustainable solutions have rapidly changed in the last few decades as environmental issues like climate ...
OCT 06, 2021
Technology
New Sensor Could Detect Antibiotics In Your Breath
OCT 06, 2021
New Sensor Could Detect Antibiotics In Your Breath
Antibiotics are the cornerstone of treatment for bacterial infections. Though antibiotic resistance caused by the incorr ...
Loading Comments...