SEP 23, 2021 10:30 AM PDT

New Glaucoma Drainage Implant Safe And Effective At Reducing Intraocular Pressure

WRITTEN BY: Ryan Vingum

Glaucoma, which affects an estimated 57 million people worldwide, is an eye condition caused by too much pressure around the eye, which can damage the optical nerve and lead to irreversible blindness. Because the prevalence of glaucoma is expected to rise by nearly 74% over the next 20 years, new ways to safely and effectively treat glaucoma are needed. 

Currently, reducing intraocular pressure to help the optic nerve is the therapeutic standard for treating glaucoma. This is usually achieved through topical treatments or through surgical procedures. Glaucoma drainage implants (GDIs) are among the more common tools used by surgeons for reducing IOP. However, some of these devices, such as the Baerveldt® implant, while effective at reducing IOP, have a high risk of post-procedure complications, such as hypotony (low IOP). They also have a higher risk of patients needing topical treatments after these procedures, as well.

Researchers at Advanced Ophthalmic Innovations recently published a paper in Nature detailing a new GDI, the PAUL® Glaucoma Implant, as well as preliminary data about it’s safety and efficacy. The paper details a study observing use of the PAUL GDI on 97 eyes in 99 patients at the Manchester Royal Eye Hospital in the UK. 

Overall, preliminary results showed that the PAUL implant was successful at reducing IOP pressure and reducing the need for topical medications to manage glaucoma. Findings also showed that eyes treated with the PAUL implant had half the cases of hypotony and a greater reduction in IOP pressure compared to the Baerveldt implant at 6 and 12 months post procedure, as evidenced by the following changes in IOP pressure: 

  • 15 mmHg and 13.6 mmHg (Baerveldt)
  • 13.6 mmHg and 13.3 mmHg (PAUL) 

The PAUL device also allowed for a slight mean reduction in the number of topical treatments needed after the procedure compared to the Baerveldt device.

The researchers at AOI note that more work is needed to compare their new device with other GDIs. 

Sources: Nature; Cureus

About the Author
Professional Writing
Science writer and editor, with a focus on simplifying complex information about health, medicine, technology, and clinical drug development for a general audience.
You May Also Like
OCT 21, 2022
Neuroscience
Telemental Health Services May Enforce Existing Healthcare Inequalities
OCT 21, 2022
Telemental Health Services May Enforce Existing Healthcare Inequalities
Telemental health services may not benefit everyone equally. The corresponding study was published in the Interactive Jo ...
OCT 31, 2022
Technology
Blood Test for Diagnosing Alzheimer's
OCT 31, 2022
Blood Test for Diagnosing Alzheimer's
Alzheimer’s is a debilitating neurological condition that affects about six million American adults, according to ...
NOV 08, 2022
Technology
People say too much screen time is bad for kids. But is it really the problem?
NOV 08, 2022
People say too much screen time is bad for kids. But is it really the problem?
Screen time is a parent’s conundrum. How much screen time is too much? How do I adequately monitor my child’ ...
NOV 26, 2022
Space & Astronomy
Could We Find Life in Caves Off Earth?
NOV 26, 2022
Could We Find Life in Caves Off Earth?
In two connected studies published in the Journal of Geophysical Research: Planets, “Fundamental Science and Engin ...
NOV 22, 2022
Technology
Researchers Develop Material with Memory Using Magnets
NOV 22, 2022
Researchers Develop Material with Memory Using Magnets
In a recent study published in Sciences Advances, a team of researchers from Aalto University in Finland have developed ...
DEC 02, 2022
Chemistry & Physics
CO2 Levels Show No Sign of Slowing Down
DEC 02, 2022
CO2 Levels Show No Sign of Slowing Down
Global carbon emissions show no sign of slowing down despite a need to stay below 1.5°C of total warming, an article ...
Loading Comments...