AUG 13, 2016 12:04 PM PDT

Father's Story Illustrates Why Automated Vacuums Can Have Consequences

WRITTEN BY: Anthony Bouchard

Autonomous vacuum systems are there to make life easier for us. What was normally a daunting task to complete on your own can now be completed by a smart computer-controlled vacuum that can navigate on its own through your home and detect the dirtiest places to clean up.
 
Or do they? Are they really that smart?
 
A story from a father, named Jesse Newton, who had an autonomous vacuum running through the night went viral as it was posted on Facebook this week. As it turns out, the vacuum was doing its thing, rolling around on the floors and it certainly went right for the dirtiest places on the floor.
 
What Newton wasn’t expecting, however, was for the Roomba-branded vacuum to head straight into a pile of fresh dog poop that was laid on the living room rug, and then track it throughout the house on its vacuuming journey in the middle of the night at 1:30 A.M.
 
Newton’s illustration, shared in the original Facebook post, shows the mess that the vacuum left behind:
 

 
 
In the social media post, the Newton explained how the Roomba had gotten the stuff all over not only the carpets, but the floorboard, and in the small crevices in between them, and even the leggings of furniture throughout the house.
 
The catastrophe goes to show that perhaps those smart vacuums really aren’t that smart. I mean, sure, it went to the source of filth and tried to pick it up, but it made more of a mess than it intended by actually dragging it along with it as it tried to pick up other sources of filth.
 
At this point, the stench was permeating the entire house, and when Newton discovered the mess, he decided to try and clean the Roomba. It was so caked in the stuff, that he literally tossed it right in the bathtub. As you can imagine, the electronic-controlled vacuum didn’t turn back on after that.
 
So the story to learn here, folks, is that electronic vacuums aren’t always the best thing in the world. If you have pets, you’re more likely to see an accidental catastrophe like this one.
 
There’s nothing wrong with vacuuming your house manually, and doing so every so often will actually have positive cardiovascular and muscular effects on your body because if you keep a good pace, it can be a workout.
 
Source: The Next Web

About the Author
  • Fascinated by scientific discoveries and media, Anthony found his way here at LabRoots, where he would be able to dabble in the two. Anthony is a technology junkie that has vast experience in computer systems and automobile mechanics, as opposite as those sound.
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