APR 30, 2017 08:28 AM PDT

Using Graphene for Desalination


The world has a ton of salt water, but humans can really only drink fresh water. Obviously, something has to give; we have to find a way to desalinate our water more effectively so we can tap into the Earth's seemingly endless waves to solve our drought problems.

Graphene just might be able to help. This newfangled wonder material is being considered for filtering saline minerals from our natural water sources to make it drinkable. Special graphene filters may be able to remove salts from salt water through a process known as reverse osmosis.

Since this process usually takes up a lot of energy, graphene has been predicted by computer models to reduce the energy needed by almost half. This equates to huge savings and puts desalination into the reach of poorer communities that can't currently afford taking on this process on a widespread scale.

Graphene continues to be considered for all kinds of potential uses in the manufacturing field, such as smartphones and solar panels, but the seemingly endless flow of potential uses continues on. It should be interesting to see how it really gets used after our ability to manufacture the stuff more efficiently officially comes into focus.

About the Author
  • Fascinated by scientific discoveries and media, Anthony found his way here at LabRoots, where he would be able to dabble in the two. Anthony is a technology junkie that has vast experience in computer systems and automobile mechanics, as opposite as those sound.
You May Also Like
NOV 06, 2018
Chemistry & Physics
NOV 06, 2018
The Rise of Thorium Nuclear Reactors
In the 1960s, an experimental reactor was built at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The scientists who worked on this project had one ingenious idea: to...
NOV 07, 2018
Health & Medicine
NOV 07, 2018
Here's How Far Your Sneeze Can Travel
When you get stuck with a cold or the flu, sneezes are inevitable. But have you ever wondered how far your sneezes travel? As it turns out, your sneeze may...
NOV 11, 2018
Health & Medicine
NOV 11, 2018
Stop Procrastinating, It's Not Good for You
Procrastination is common, but some people procrastinate much more than others. Those who do it persistently probably exhibit something known as chronic pr...
NOV 21, 2018
Cardiology
NOV 21, 2018
What We Know About Kawasaki Disease
Kawasaki disease discovered by Dr. Tomisaku Kawasaki, a Japanese pediatrician, is a rare type of vasculitis, or inflammation of the blood vessels. It&rsquo...
NOV 22, 2018
Chemistry & Physics
NOV 22, 2018
The Hottest Spice That You Probably Don't Want to Savor
Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 cation channel, or TRPV1, plays an important role in the human body in sensing heat and pain.  Coincidentally...
DEC 02, 2018
Space & Astronomy
DEC 02, 2018
Here's Why Harvard Scientists Believe Oumuamua Could Have Been an Alien Spacecraft
  When an interstellar object came sailing through our solar system last year, it astonished astronomers because they couldn’t quite categorize...
Loading Comments...