APR 30, 2018 5:22 AM PDT

Is 25 the new 18?


Adolescence, in terms of brain development, happens between the ages of 10 and 19. Recent research shows that span might need to be extended almost to the mid-20s. While many animals give birth to offspring that can walk and seek food immediately after birth, human babies must develop these skills over the years. Adolescence is the same way and appears to take much longer than previously thought.

Because there is still physical and mental growth going on, even until legal adulthood at age 18, it's hard to say when, regarding chronological age, a person is truly an adult. A mature brain takes time to form. Before it's "fully cooked" the brain is vulnerable to any kind of disruption. The frontal lobe where planning, impulse, and memory is processed, isn't finished making new neurons until the age of about 24. Given what we know about brain development, it's a safe bet that eventually we all mature enough to make good decisions, but the teen years, however long they last, are still going to be a little rocky.
About the Author
  • I'm a writer living in the Boston area. My interests include cancer research, cardiology and neuroscience. I want to be part of using the Internet and social media to educate professionals and patients in a collaborative environment.
You May Also Like
APR 22, 2020
Chemistry & Physics
APR 22, 2020
Want to Peek at Atoms? There's a Microscope for That
Optical microscopes can help us see the microscopic world, but to use them to examine individual atoms is like measuring ...
MAY 27, 2020
Chemistry & Physics
MAY 27, 2020
Light-Bearing Ether: How a Historical Null Result Revolutionized Modern Physics
Ether (or aether) is a term used in ancient mythology and medieval science to denote the matter that fills in the void o ...
JUN 01, 2020
Plants & Animals
JUN 01, 2020
Sifaka Lemurs Endure Dangerous Ventures to Find Food
Sifaka lemurs exist in families of such large numbers, that even an entire cluster of massive trees isn’t fruitful ...
JUN 09, 2020
Space & Astronomy
JUN 09, 2020
Why SpaceX's Droneship Footage Often Cuts Out During Landings
SpaceX has nearly mastered the art of landing the first stages of the plethora of rockets its sends into space so that t ...
JUN 26, 2020
Neuroscience
JUN 26, 2020
Artificial and Natural Neurons Communicate Using Dopamine
Researchers from Stanford University have shown that artificial neurons can communicate with biological neurons with dop ...
JUL 02, 2020
Chemistry & Physics
JUL 02, 2020
Carbon Nanolattices: Lighter Than (Atomic) Feathers, Tougher Than Diamonds
Carbon is known for its plentiful allotropes, such as the naturally existing graphite and diamond, as well as synthetic ...
Loading Comments...