SEP 19, 2013 10:45 AM PDT

Working Gears Evolved in Plant-Hopping Insect

WRITTEN BY: Jennifer Ellis


A study in the journal Science reveals that a juvenile form of the insect Issus Coleoptratus evolved gears to help with jumping. This is the first time working gears have been observed in an animal species.
About the Author
  • I love all things science and am passionate about bringing science to the public through writing. With an M.S. in Genetics and experience in cancer research, marketing and technical writing, it is a pleasure to share the latest trends and findings in science on LabRoots.
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