APR 08, 2015 9:35 AM PDT

The Brontosaurus Is Back, But For Some, It Never Left

WRITTEN BY: Judy O'Rourke

The scientific community considered the brontosaurus unworthy of its own genus, but the "thunder lizard" is back after a new analysis of specimens. [Source: Newsy Science]
About the Author
  • Judy O'Rourke worked as a newspaper reporter before becoming chief editor of Clinical Lab Products magazine. As a freelance writer today, she is interested in finding the story behind the latest developments in medicine and science, and in learning what lies ahead.
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