JUL 07, 2015 8:35 AM PDT

Flying Rays


Picture a calm sea off the coast of Mexico. It's sunny, the waves are lapping along and then right out of nowhere comes some enormous bat-like fish, with a wing span the size of a car wheel and a long sharp tail. That would be a Mobula ray, second in size to the Manta ray and part of the same family of rays that cruise the warm ocean waters off Mexico.

The Mobulas swim in large groups and the males, while slightly larger than females, don't really stand out from crowd easily. A school of mobula rays is just a large moving mass of black and white. So, in order to show off their manly Mobular-ness, male rays will leap out of the ocean above the swimming pack, gracefully looking like they might actually take flight and then drop back down to the water's surface with a resounding belly flop. The noise they make hitting the water, attracts the attention of females and if all goes well, the males can find themselves a mate in no time. Some females get into the action too, leaping from the depths and crashing back down.

Check out this video from BBC to see the diving devil rays in action.
About the Author
  • I'm a writer living in the Boston area. My interests include cancer research, cardiology and neuroscience. I want to be part of using the Internet and social media to educate professionals and patients in a collaborative environment.
You May Also Like
MAR 20, 2020
Cardiology
MAR 20, 2020
Exercise For Persons With COPD
The thought of starting an exercise program can be daunting, particularly for those who have been diagnosed with chronic ...
MAR 30, 2020
Plants & Animals
MAR 30, 2020
Packs of Humboldt Squid Rise From the Deep to Feed
Deep-sea dwellers are among some of the most intriguing marine creatures in the world, partly because it isn’t ver ...
APR 07, 2020
Space & Astronomy
APR 07, 2020
Here's The Reason Why Space is Black
Anyone who can tilt their head up enough to glance at the night sky would be able to tell you that outer space looks bla ...
APR 15, 2020
Chemistry & Physics
APR 15, 2020
Pandemic Maths: Why Time Doesn't Matter in Understanding Infection Trajectory
There's no doubt that a lot of our current attention goes to the COVID-19 infection cases, as media outlets publish ...
MAY 01, 2020
Chemistry & Physics
MAY 01, 2020
John Conway: the Late Maths Legend and His Game of Life
If maths is the only universal language, then John Horton Conway is among the few who can speak it perfectly. Unfortunat ...
MAY 21, 2020
Chemistry & Physics
MAY 21, 2020
The Nature of Glass Still Dumbfounds Scientists
There are many things we humans have come to perfect, but don't yet fully understand. Take glass for example, scientists ...
Loading Comments...