SEP 10, 2015 09:08 AM PDT

Check Out This Solar Tornado


NASA has shared this video of a very cool solar tornado from the Sun's surface as captured by the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). The tornado lasted around 40 hours between September 1st-September 3rd.

The solar particles involved in this spiraling helix are said to be around 5 million degrees Fahrenheit, and the temperature of the particles in the tornado were in the ultraviolet wavelength of light.

NASA notes that the ripping back and forth and the spiraling motions were caused by "powerful magnetic forces" generated by the Sun.

If you thought an Earth tornado was deadly… trust me, you wouldn't want to be anywhere near this one.

About the Author
  • Fascinated by scientific discoveries and media, Anthony found his way here at LabRoots, where he would be able to dabble in the two. Anthony is a technology junkie that has vast experience in computer systems and automobile mechanics, as opposite as those sound.
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