FEB 19, 2016 01:35 PM PST

A DIY Ice Storm

WRITTEN BY: Kara Marker
6 6 1327

Multiple universities and research institutes in the north are invested in studying ice storms and their impact on the environment. However, since weather can still be unpredictable, it is not always easy to study ice storms. However, a new project where researchers recreated an ice storm using an NSF "experimental forest" may be the first step toward fighting back against ice destruction.

Considered one of "nature's most destructive forces," ice storms have an enormous ecological impact. In their delicately constructed "ice lab," researchers measured accumulation and made other observations for studying the impact of the ice on the forest.
About the Author
  • I am a scientific journalist and enthusiast, especially in the realm of biomedicine. I am passionate about conveying the truth in scientific phenomena and subsequently improving health and public awareness. Sometimes scientific research needs a translator to effectively communicate the scientific jargon present in significant findings. I plan to be that translating communicator, and I hope to decrease the spread of misrepresented scientific phenomena! Check out my science blog: ScienceKara.com.
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