MAY 17, 2016 10:00 AM PDT
Epstein-Barr Virus Infections: Pay Me Now or Pay Me Later
SPONSORED BY: DiaSorin
CONTINUING EDUCATION (CME/CE/CEU) CREDITS: P.A.C.E. CE
21 75 9477

Speakers:
  • Professor of Pediatrics and Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, University of Minnesota
    Biography
      Dr. Balfour is Professor of Pediatrics in the Division of Infectious Diseases and Professor of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology. He also serves as Principal Investigator of Clinical Virology Programs. Dr. Balfour is recognized internationally as an expert in the diagnosis and treatment of herpesvirus infections, especially those due to EBV. Dr. Balfour received his MD degree from Columbia in 1966, completed his internship and residency at the University of Minnesota and Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center in 1968, served as a pediatrician in the Air Force at Wright-Patterson Air Base, Dayton, OH from 1968-70, and then completed a post-doctoral fellowship in Infectious Disease at the University of Minnesota in 1972. He has been on the University of Minnesota faculty ever since. He is board certified in Pediatrics.

    Abstract:
    10:00AM PT – 12:00PM CT – 1:00PM ET

    Infectious mononucleosis has been recognized as a unique disease for more than 100 years and its cause, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), was discovered more than 50 years ago.  Yet, there is no licensed vaccine and no clear-cut effective treatment for infections due to EBV. This webinar will explain why. We will cover: the clinical findings and laboratory tests for diagnosing and staging primary EBV infection; the mechanisms EBV uses to induce cancer and autoimmune diseases, especially multiple sclerosis; research approaches to prevention of EBV infection. Essentially all of us acquire EBV during our lifetime. Is it better to get it sooner or later? What do you think?

    Learning objectives:
     
    • At the conclusion of this webinar, you should be better able to:
    • Evaluate the clinical findings and laboratory tests used to diagnose EBV infection.
    • Discuss the probable mechanisms of EBV-spurred cancers and autoimmune disease.
    • Assess approaches to prevention of EBV infections.

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