OCT 25, 2018 10:30 AM PDT

Trash or Treasure: Optimizing Titration Electrodes and Consumables

SPONSORED BY: Metrohm USA
C.E. CREDITS: P.A.C.E. CE | Florida CE
Speakers
  • Technical Support Specialist, Metrohm
    Biography
      Jessica graduated with a B.S. degree in forensic and toxicological chemistry from West Chester University of Pennsylvania. After graduating, her career started in the pharmaceutical industry as a QC chemist. She then moved to Florida to continue her career as an R&D chemist, developing new methods for generic drugs. At Metrohm USA, she is a technical support specialist. She uses her technical skills to help customers troubleshoot their instruments and/or software when they are in need of assistance.
    • Product Manager for Titration, Metrohm
      Biography
        Lori Spafford is the Product Manager for Titration for Metrohm USA. She has a Bachelor's degree in chemistry from St. Joseph's College in Indiana and over 10 years of experience in the chemical, food & beverage, and environmental industries. During her prior 3 years as an Applications Chemist at Metrohm USA, she has focused on the development of thermometric titration and has successfully brought innovative solutions to difficult applications in a variety of industries.

      Abstract:

      Everyone that uses titration in their lab knows how simple and fast the technique can be.  However, uncertainty around when to replace electrodes creates confusion. Reagent quality, tubing connections and sample matrix can cause symptoms that mimic an expiring electrode. Understanding these influences and the proper maintenance of your electrode improves lab operations and increases confidence in your results. 

      Attend this webinar and gain the knowledge to confidently evaluate your system and decide with certainty when to replace the electrode.  Hear from Jessica McVay, Technical Support Specialist at Metrohm USA, on her top 5 simple ways to know when to replace your electrode and Lori Spafford, Product Manager at Metrohm USA, on how you can responsibly dispose of your retired electrodes.

      Knowing exactly when to replace your electrode ensures accurate results without the fear of wasting valuable lab time and resources.  

      Learning Objectives:

      1. Understand how to troubleshoot a titration system
      2. Hear 5 simple ways to identify an electrode that needs replacement
      3. Learn how to responsibly dispose of your retired electrodes


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