OCT 14, 2015 7:00 AM PDT

WEBINAR: Understanding Cancer: Cell-matrix interactions and the 3D cell migration

Sponsored by: Bitplane, Bitplane
Speakers
  • Assistant Professor, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Eindhoven University of Technology
    Biography
      Assistant Professor, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Eindhoven University of Technology
      Nicholas Kurniawan received his Ph.D. in 2012 from the National University of Singapore (Singapore), studying the role of matrix viscoelasticity in cancer metastasis. He then carried out his postdoctoral research as a Marie Curie Fellow in FOM Institute AMOLF, Amsterdam (the Netherlands), investigating the hierarchical structure-property relation in the cytoskeleton and extracellular matrices.
      His works have provided important insights into the underlying physical mechanisms behind the intriguing nonlinear behaviors of protein networks. In 2015, he joined Eindhoven University of Technology in Eindhoven, the Netherlands, as an assistant professor in the Biomedical Engineering Department. Combining his expertise on biopolymers physics, cell biomechanics, and cytoskeletal rheology, his current research focuses on the biophysical and mechanobiological aspects of cell-matrix interactions and the applications in regenerative medicine.

    Abstract:

    Please note that Oct. 14, 7am PDT means following time in Europe:  Oct. 14, 3pm CET



    The search to discover a cure for cancer has been at the forefront of scientific research for many years. During this webinar we will look at how Imaris software from Bitplane has been used to analyse cell migration behavior, a key facet to better understanding how cancer works.

    Migration of cells is integral in various physiological processes in all facets of life. These range from embryonic development, morphogenesis, and wound healing, to disease pathology such as cancer metastasis.

    While cell migratory behavior has been traditionally studied using simple assays on culture dishes, in recent years it has been increasingly realized that the physical, mechanical, and chemical aspects of the matrix are key determinants of the migration mechanism.

    In this presentation, we discuss the dynamic cell–matrix mechanical interactions that occur during cell migration, as well as their role and manifestations in determining the overall efficiency of migration.

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