NOV 06, 2019 7:30 AM PST

Toward a universal influenza virus vaccine

Presented at: Influenza 2019
C.E. Credits: P.A.C.E. CE Florida CE
Speaker
  • Professor, Departments of Microbiology and Medicine, Tisch Cancer Center Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai
    Biography
      Dr. García-Sastre is Professor in the Departments of Microbiology and Medicine and in the Tisch Cancer Center at Icahn School of Medicine Mount Sinai (ISMMS) in New York,. He is also Director of the Global Health and Emerging Pathogens Institute at ISMMS, and Principal Investigator for the Center for Research on Influenza Pathogenesis (CRIP), one of five NIAID Centers of Excellence for Influenza Research and Surveillance (CEIRS). For the past 30 years, his research interest has been focused on the molecular biology, virus-host interactions, innate immunity and pathogenesis of influenza viruses and several other RNA viruses, as well as on the development of new vaccines and antivirals. He has more than 500 peer-reviewed publications in these areas of research. He has been President of the International Society for Vaccines in 2014-2015. He is Editor for the scientific journals PLoS Pathogens, Journal of Virology and Virus Research. In 2017, he has been elected a fellow of the Royal Academy of Pharmacy in Spain. In 2019, he was recognized with a Honorary Doctor Degree from the University of Burgos, Spain. Also in 2019, he was elected a member of the National Academy of Sciences.

    Abstract

    Since the establishment of reverse genetics techniques to manipulate the influenza virus genome, it has been possible to study viral molecular signatures responsible for virulence, and the generation of novel and improved vaccine strains. Moreover, high throughput screen technologies combined with functional genomics, transcriptomics and proteomics are now been used to identify novel mechanisms associated with virus replication and pathogenicity, as well as novel antivirals. Finally recombinant technologies can now be applied for the generation of broadly neutralizing influenza virus vaccines that could eliminate the need for annual vaccination and prevent pandemics by inducing protective immunity against conserved epitope shared by all influenza virus strains.
     
    Learning objectives:

    1. Current influenza vaccines and antivirals are useful, but not optimal
    2. New technologies allow the discovery of improved influenza antivirals and vaccines


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