AUG 01, 2019 10:00 PM PDT

Avoiding Sugar In Unexpected Places

WRITTEN BY: Abbie Arce

Most people are under the false impression that what they eat is healthy. There is such a disconnect between the processed, prepackaged foods we eat today and the food we are meant to consume. Even when a person tries to follow a healthy diet, many of the foods advertising themselves as healthy are overly processed and full of sugar.

This sugar-loaded diet is a huge contributor to the obesity epidemic. Poor diet in combination with inactivity results in lifestyle diseases like hypertension and diabetes. The deadliest of which, heart disease, kills hundreds of thousands of Americans each year.

This is even more alarming when you consider that projections expect this number to greatly increase in coming years. With the foods, we consume it’s of little surprise that Americans are expected to gain weight and experience an increased risk for chronic disease. Additionally, parts of the world that have never experienced such problems are going to see great increases is such these illnesses as well.

Incredibly, these diseases are largely preventable and in many cases even reversible through diet and exercise. Though changes on an individual level are possible, larger systemic change is needed. Many nutritionists and healthcare professionals would like to see more honest labeling from food companies. These companies purposefully use confusing labeling and multiple terms for the additive to mask the high sugar content in their products.

The consumption of such high levels of sugar is associated with several negative health consequences. In addition to obesity, these include weight gain and increased risk of heart disease, diabetes, cancer, depression, accelerated cellular aging and more.

Nutritionists recommend consumer education on the many ways companies label sugar in their products. It is also recommended that people move away from processed, prepackaged foods to whole foods prepared in the home. This allows a person to control the sugar, salt and fat content and increase the nutritional value of their meals.

Many people start with the gradual removal of high sugar foods from their diet. Some of the worst offenders are sodas, juices, and prepackaged snacks. Simply swapping a daily sugary coffee beverage for drip coffee with little or no sugar can cut hundreds of grams of the sweet stuff from a person's diet each week. Additionally, this type of gradual replacement seems to work better for people than a more sudden dietary change.

The above video gives real-world examples of just how much sugar is in the foods we consume. It also gives practical advice for decoding food labels so that consumers can make healthier food choices.

 

Sources: National Institutes of HealthTED

About the Author
  • Abbie is an AFAA certified personal trainer and fitness instructor with an interest in all things health-science. She has recently graduated with her BS in Applied Sport and Exercise Science from Barry University in Miami. Next, she intends to earn an MPH with a focus in Epidemiology.
You May Also Like
SEP 15, 2020
Cardiology
Dopamine Could Cause Heart Arrhythmia After Heart Failure
SEP 15, 2020
Dopamine Could Cause Heart Arrhythmia After Heart Failure
Everyone knows that friend with a tattoo of a molecule of dopamine. Usually associated with the pleasure response, it is ...
SEP 17, 2020
Clinical & Molecular DX
Blood Vessels on a Chip Test Clotting
SEP 17, 2020
Blood Vessels on a Chip Test Clotting
Blood clotting, also known as coagulation, is a critical biological mechanism to prevent excessive blood loss in the eve ...
SEP 21, 2020
Clinical & Molecular DX
Smart Wearable Patch Signals Trouble Following Traumatic Injury
SEP 21, 2020
Smart Wearable Patch Signals Trouble Following Traumatic Injury
An ambulance pulls up to the site of a car accident, sirens blazing. Paramedics assess the crash victims, looking for si ...
OCT 04, 2020
Cardiology
The Genetics of Body Fat May Shape Health Risks
OCT 04, 2020
The Genetics of Body Fat May Shape Health Risks
The work may help explain why men and women are at risk for different diseases and often respond to different treatments ...
DEC 22, 2020
Cardiology
A New 3D Imaging Method for Atherosclerosis Analysis in Mice
DEC 22, 2020
A New 3D Imaging Method for Atherosclerosis Analysis in Mice
Imaging in research may not sound glamorous, but how else would news stories get those cool looking science photos for t ...
FEB 10, 2021
Cardiology
Finding the Link Between Air Pollution & Heart Disease
FEB 10, 2021
Finding the Link Between Air Pollution & Heart Disease
While many studies have shown that air pollution is linked to negative health impacts including poor cardiovascular heal ...
Loading Comments...