OCT 22, 2016 7:06 AM PDT

Scientists May Have Solved the Mystery of the Bermuda Triangle

WRITTEN BY: Anthony Bouchard

The mystery of the Bermuda Triangle (also known as the Devil’s Triangle) has stumped scientists for decades.

Update: The meteorologist behind these findings has issued a statement following these reports suggesting the microbursts alone probably aren't responsible for the disappearance of many ships and planes in the region. The Bermuda Triangle remains a very mysterious location and it's hard to say for sure what's caused all of these unexplained disappearances.
 

A number of ships and planes have gone missing in the infamous region known as the Bermuda Triangle.

 Image Credit: Science Channel

For far too long, a myriad of ships and planes have randomly went missing whenever passing through this region. Survivors have said compasses and geolocation devices go crazy, and conspiracy theorists have blamed several things ranging from aliens to the government.
 
But more realistically, what could really be the root cause of what’s going on in this region connected by the three points of Miami, Florida; San Juan, Puerto Rico; and Bermuda?
 
Scientists think they’re made a breakthrough discovery that could lay to rest all the fairy tale rumors of the region, and the first clue they discovered was found in the clouds. Hexagonally shaped, rather than fluffy and puffy like anywhere else in the world, it has been theorized that ‘air bombs’ are being formed in the atmosphere and would be detrimental to ships and planes.
 

Hexagonally-shaped clouds over the Bermuda Triangle suggest the presence of 'air bombs,' otherwise known as microbursts.

 Image Credit: Science Channel

These ‘air bombs,’ more prominently known to the world as microbursts, can occur in certain atmospheric conditions and can literally swat a plane out of the air and over-turn large ships with Hurricane-force wind speeds of more than 170 miles per hour.
 
“They are formed by what are called microbursts and they're blasts of air that come down out of the bottom of a cloud and then hit the ocean and then create waves that can sometimes be massive in size as they start to interact with each other,” Meteorologist Randy Cerveny explains. “Most of the time, clouds are random in their distribution.”

In a microburst, a high-speed burst of air exits the clouds in the sky and forces its way down towards the Earth's surface; or in this case, the Atlantic Ocean.
 
These incredible forces of nature have been responsible for the loss of more than 1,000 lives in the past 100 years, and at least four planes and 20 ships are said to go missing on an annual basis.
 
This is for sure an interesting theory that makes a lot of sense. Microbursts aren’t technically very common occurrences, but the Bermuda Triangle seems to be a hotspot for this kind of activity. Scientists aren’t really sure why.
 
For what it’s worth, the Bermuda Triangle is just one of the ten Vile Vortices around the world. There are many more just like it, but the Bermuda Triangle is certainly the most famous one.
 

The world's ten Vile Vortices.


Despite these findings, it's not a solution to the issue. The Bermuda Triangle is simply a dangerous place to sail a ship or fly a plane, and that may never change. The exact reason for why these microbursts occur in the region is still unknown.
 


Source: Science Channel

About the Author
  • Fascinated by scientific discoveries and media, Anthony found his way here at LabRoots, where he would be able to dabble in the two. Anthony is a technology junkie that has vast experience in computer systems and automobile mechanics, as opposite as those sound.
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