SEP 11, 2018 10:43 PM PDT

Stimuli-Responsive Nanoparticles as a Drug Delivery Method

WRITTEN BY: Nouran Amin

Image Credit: Phys.Org

Researchers at Washington State University (WSU), who were finding a way to fight an inflammatory response that causes organ failure better known as sepsis, show that stimuli-responsive nanoparticles can target infections to simultaneously inhibit the spread of bacteria and decrease inflammation. Such microscopic particles include abundant antibiotic and anti-inflammatory agents that are released when the particles encounter an infection in the body.

"This study not only proves a new drug delivery system but also may shift the current landscape in nanomedicine to a biology-driven design of nanotherapeutics. This has the potential to improve the therapies of many more infectious diseases," explains Zhenjia Wang, a pharmaceutical sciences professor.

The research study, published in the journal Advanced Materials, shows how WSU scientists developed a new nanoparticle that is coated with compounds that are commonly secreted by blood vessels in response to an infection. The nanoparticle is sensitive to infections sites allowing the bacterial enzymes to be triggered for the release of drugs.

Image Credit: Structure of a nanoparticle via Kaust.edu

Although with antibiotics and anti-inflammatories are used to mitigate the onset of sepsis, there remain issues with “old school use of these therapies”. "This study will allow chemists and materials engineers to design new drug formulations to treat many bacterial infections, such as TB infection," explains Can Yang Zhang, who is the leading author on the paper and a postdoctoral research associate in the Wang lab.

In medicine, nanoparticle technology is growing, however, it is a first time that a nanocarrier has been developed to deliver not one, but two drugs. Furthermore, nanocarrier specifically targets infection sites, so less medicine may be a needed to fix collateral damage to otherwise healthy tissues.

Source: Washington State University

About the Author
  • Nouran earned her BS and MS in Biology at IUPUI and currently shares her love of science by teaching. She enjoys writing on various topics as well including science & medicine, global health, and conservation biology. She hopes through her writing she can make science more engaging and communicable to the general public.
You May Also Like
JAN 21, 2020
Cannabis Sciences
JAN 21, 2020
Medical Marijuana Ineffective for Long Term Pain Management
Medicinal cannabis may not as effective as once thought as a solution for sleep problems for those with chronic pain in the long run, according to new find...
JAN 18, 2020
Drug Discovery & Development
JAN 18, 2020
Drug Combo Targets Osteoarthritis
Individuals suffering from osteoarthritis often face challenges of limited treatment options mainly pain relievers or joint replacement surgery. However, s...
FEB 21, 2020
Drug Discovery & Development
FEB 21, 2020
Why is it so Difficult to Develop a Vaccine for Coronavirus?
As of February 21st, 2,250 have died worldwide from Coronavirus, while 18,862 have recovered and 55,703 are currently infected. Having made top news storie...
MAR 12, 2020
Drug Discovery & Development
MAR 12, 2020
Recent Data Accelerates Coronavirus SARS-CoV2 Drug Discovery
Coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) is a currently a human health crisis. It is not only highly infectious but results severe pneumonia (COVID-19) in some cases. Now,...
MAR 23, 2020
Cancer
MAR 23, 2020
An Alternative Use for Common Kidney Cancer Drug to Fight Against Epithelial Ovarian Cancer
Axitinib is a small molecule drug that inhibits VEGFR tyrosine kinases 1, 2, and 3. Shown previously to potentially prevent angiogenesis and promote apoptosis in cancer cells...
MAR 16, 2020
Drug Discovery & Development
MAR 16, 2020
Critical Interleukin Leads to Drug Discovery
The immune molecule interleukin-2 (IL-2) is a growth factor that stimulates the immune system to produce T-cells. Their powerful effects have encouraged re...
Loading Comments...