SEP 11, 2018 10:43 PM PDT

Stimuli-Responsive Nanoparticles as a Drug Delivery Method

WRITTEN BY: Nouran Amin

Image Credit: Phys.Org

Researchers at Washington State University (WSU), who were finding a way to fight an inflammatory response that causes organ failure better known as sepsis, show that stimuli-responsive nanoparticles can target infections to simultaneously inhibit the spread of bacteria and decrease inflammation. Such microscopic particles include abundant antibiotic and anti-inflammatory agents that are released when the particles encounter an infection in the body.

"This study not only proves a new drug delivery system but also may shift the current landscape in nanomedicine to a biology-driven design of nanotherapeutics. This has the potential to improve the therapies of many more infectious diseases," explains Zhenjia Wang, a pharmaceutical sciences professor.

The research study, published in the journal Advanced Materials, shows how WSU scientists developed a new nanoparticle that is coated with compounds that are commonly secreted by blood vessels in response to an infection. The nanoparticle is sensitive to infections sites allowing the bacterial enzymes to be triggered for the release of drugs.

Image Credit: Structure of a nanoparticle via Kaust.edu

Although with antibiotics and anti-inflammatories are used to mitigate the onset of sepsis, there remain issues with “old school use of these therapies”. "This study will allow chemists and materials engineers to design new drug formulations to treat many bacterial infections, such as TB infection," explains Can Yang Zhang, who is the leading author on the paper and a postdoctoral research associate in the Wang lab.

In medicine, nanoparticle technology is growing, however, it is a first time that a nanocarrier has been developed to deliver not one, but two drugs. Furthermore, nanocarrier specifically targets infection sites, so less medicine may be a needed to fix collateral damage to otherwise healthy tissues.

Source: Washington State University

About the Author
  • Nouran earned her BS and MS in Biology at IUPUI and currently shares her love of science by teaching. She enjoys writing on various topics as well including science & medicine, global health, and conservation biology. She hopes through her writing she can make science more engaging and communicable to the general public.
You May Also Like
MAY 06, 2020
Drug Discovery & Development
MAY 06, 2020
Why Doctors are Repurposing Drugs to Treat COVID-19
Creating a drug from scratch is a lengthy process. Often taking years, given the rate of infection and deadliness of COV ...
MAY 13, 2020
Drug Discovery & Development
MAY 13, 2020
Drug Targets Off Episodes of Parkinson
A novel drug was approved by the FDA to target the “off” episodes of Parkinson disease. The drug is referred ...
MAY 25, 2020
Drug Discovery & Development
MAY 25, 2020
Potential Targets for Alcohol Induced Liver Disease
Alcohol-related liver disease (ALD) is a fatal condition targeting more than 150 million people. Part of what makes it d ...
JUN 24, 2020
Drug Discovery & Development
JUN 24, 2020
Gilead to Test Inhalable Remdesivir Against COVID-19
Gilead has announced that it will soon start trials for an inhalable form of Remdesivir, the first drug to receive Emerg ...
JUN 22, 2020
Drug Discovery & Development
JUN 22, 2020
New Drug Shows Promise in Fatty Liver Disease
A scientist leads a team to discover the first-of-its-class drug that can inhibit a key enzyme safely and effectively in ...
JUL 02, 2020
Cardiology
JUL 02, 2020
Managing the Mitochondria After a Heart Attack
Heart attacks are an unfortunately common occurrence across the country. One of the biggest consequences of a heart atta ...
Loading Comments...