FEB 20, 2019 2:43 PM PST

Cocktail of Common Antibiotics Fights E. coli Infections

WRITTEN BY: Nouran Amin

Researchers at the Technical University of Denmark are working towards finding new methods for battling antibiotic resistant bacteria. Currently, many disease-causing bacteria retain resistant genes that protect them against antibiotic treatment. One such resistant gene, CTX-M-15, involves encoding the protein--extended spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) which leads to resistance in E. coli for urinary tract infections.

Learn more on antibiotic-resistant bacteria:

However, most recently researchers showed that a cocktail of two common antibiotics, mecillinam and cefotaxime, can result in specific multi-resistant E. coli (extended spectrum beta-lactamase, ESBL) sensitive to treatment again. Results of the cocktail antibiotics study was published in Nature and shows that bacteria resistant to mecillinam, were now sensitive to the drug cefotaxime and bacteria that had become resistant to cefotaxime were now sensitive towards mecillinam. These drugs could be administered orally -- as pills, making it easier for doctors to prescribe the already approved drugs to treat multi-drug resistant E. coli (ESBL) infections.

Image Credit: ZMESCIENCE.com

"The results are interesting because we showed that bacteria simply can't survive both drugs. Also, the same gene with only one mutation shows this switch-function. Normally, you will find multiple mutations in multiple resistance genes, controlling different mechanisms," says first-author Carola Rosenkilde, PhD-student at the Novo Nordisk Foundation Center for Biosustainability (DTU Biosustain) at Technical University of Denmark (DTU). "We need to take precautionary measures to avoid resistance, because it is very likely that this mutation will occur at some point. By giving both mecillinam and cefotaxime at the same time, the CTX-M-15 mutation works like a switch, and the bacteria become sensitive to treatment again.”

Source: Technical University of Denmark

About the Author
BS/MS
Nouran is a scientist, educator, and life-long learner with a passion for making science more communicable. When not busy in the lab isolating blood macrophages, she enjoys writing on various STEM topics.
You May Also Like
JUN 07, 2022
Cell & Molecular Biology
Advances in Laboratory Automation Research at the 2022 Labroots Virtual Event
JUN 07, 2022
Advances in Laboratory Automation Research at the 2022 Labroots Virtual Event
Labroots hosted its 6th Annual Laboratory Automation Virtual Event on May 18, 2022. The speaker roster for this free con ...
JUL 03, 2022
Cell & Molecular Biology
Reversing the Spread of a Deadly Cancer
JUL 03, 2022
Reversing the Spread of a Deadly Cancer
One of the deadliest types of cancer is pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC); the survival rate at five years after d ...
JUL 06, 2022
Drug Discovery & Development
Promising New Treatment Strategy for Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthrtis
JUL 06, 2022
Promising New Treatment Strategy for Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthrtis
Researchers have identified a new potential strategy for inhibiting inflammation in both psoriasis and psoriatic arthrit ...
JUL 14, 2022
Plants & Animals
Using Worms to Study Precision Medicine
JUL 14, 2022
Using Worms to Study Precision Medicine
Personalized medicine refers to making decisions about treatment that are optimized to a specific individual, often as a ...
JUL 22, 2022
Coronavirus
Researchers Say Nasal Boosters Will be Important to Stopping COVID
JUL 22, 2022
Researchers Say Nasal Boosters Will be Important to Stopping COVID
The SARS-CoV-2 virus has continued to evolve since the start of the pandemic, and we've moved down the list of variants ...
AUG 16, 2022
Neuroscience
Phone Therapy Shows Promise for Treating Tinnitus
AUG 16, 2022
Phone Therapy Shows Promise for Treating Tinnitus
 A phone-based therapy has shown encouraging results in treating tinnitus in a recent clinical trial. The correspon ...
Loading Comments...