FEB 25, 2020 9:13 PM PST

Treating stroke with low dose of clot-busting drug

WRITTEN BY: Nouran Amin

A study concludes that a low-dose of the clot-busting drug—tenecteplase—may be beneficial for eligible stroke patients that do not need an intervention for the mechanical removal of a clot. Specifically, researchers studied whether a dose of 0.25mg/kg or 0.40mg/kg of tenecteplase can be optimal for clot removal. Previously, alteplase was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) roughly two decades ago for treating ischemic stroke within 3 hours of onset.

Now, tenecteplase is a genetically modified variant of alteplase that may be more convenient because it is administered as a single injection venous and restores blood flow to the brain much better than alteplase in an old trial. However, tenecteplase is not currently approved for ischemic stroke—and even if it was approved researchers say that patients may still need to undergo surgical clot removal for maximum efficacy.

"The two doses behaved very similarly overall, and there was no advantage to increasing the dose beyond 0.25mg/kg in this study," said Bruce Campbell, M.B.B.S., B.Med.Sc., Ph.D., head of stroke at the Royal Melbourne Hospital and professorial fellow at the University of Melbourne in Parkville, Australia. "These results provide reassurance that there is a window of safety if the weight-based dose is inadvertently overestimated."

Learn more about stroke:

"In addition, about 34% of patients treated in rural centers had substantially improved blood flow by the time they arrived at a hospital capable of performing mechanical clot removal," Campbell said. "This treatment could be particularly important for them."

Source: Science Daily

About the Author
  • Nouran earned her BS and MS in Biology at IUPUI and currently shares her love of science by teaching. She enjoys writing on various topics as well including science & medicine, global health, and conservation biology. She hopes through her writing she can make science more engaging and communicable to the general public.
You May Also Like
JAN 16, 2020
Cancer
JAN 16, 2020
FLASH proton therapy: faster and more effective
A new technique called FLASH proposes a new type of radiation therapy. The technique is composed of an ultra-high dose rate of radiotherapy and uses electr...
JAN 22, 2020
Cannabis Sciences
JAN 22, 2020
Antibiotic Properties Found in Cannabis Compound
The World Health Organization has identified antibiotic resistance, when bacteria no longer respond to antibiotics, as one of the biggest threats to global...
JAN 18, 2020
Drug Discovery & Development
JAN 18, 2020
Using Vitamins to Treat Pediatric Sepsis
New research indicates that is very much possible to treat pediatric septic shock in children with a combination of intravenous vitamin C and intravenous v...
FEB 17, 2020
Cancer
FEB 17, 2020
Listening in on cancer cells
Research published today in Nature Methods reports a new technique of “listening” to cancer cells. While it may sound odd (no pun intended...
FEB 21, 2020
Health & Medicine
FEB 21, 2020
Should You Really be Scared of the Coronavirus?
As of February 21st, the death toll for coronavirus reached 2,250, 55,707 currently infected, of which 12,066 (22%) are in a serious or critical condition....
MAR 28, 2020
Drug Discovery & Development
MAR 28, 2020
The Antibody Test to See if You've Already Had the Coronavirus
Knowing whether you’ve had the virus or not may not just reduce your need to panic- but also better help epidemiologists map out the spread of the vi...
Loading Comments...