JUN 17, 2021 8:00 AM PDT

How T Cells Sense Dangerous Invaders

WRITTEN BY: Tara Fernandez

T cells form a major part of our immune defenses, protecting us against the constant barrage of potentially pathogenic pathogens in our environment. Now, immunologists from Monash University reveal new insights on the intricacies surrounding T cell activation upon encountering such pathogenic threats.

In a study published in the journal Science, a team led by Nicole La Gruta found that to generate a robust activating signal, T cells need to latch on to pathogens such as viruses in a specific orientation. T cell receptors on the surface of these immune cells latch on to fragments of infectious agents called antigens, presented on the surface of infected cells. This critical recognition event triggers a cascade of molecular events leading to the destruction and elimination of an infected cell.

"The central issue is that there are millions of different T cell receptors (TCRs) in the human body, and a vast array of viruses, making it difficult to understand the rules around how T cell receptor recognition of a virus drives T cell activation. Indeed, it is a problem that has remained contentious for over 25 years" explained La Gruta.

Using a suite of experimental technologies including super-resolution microscopy, biochemical assays and in vitro and animal models, La Gruta and colleagues found that the orientation in which the TCR binds to its target determines if the T cell is activated. 

"This is an advance in our fundamental understanding of how a T cell needs to 'see' pathogenic antigens in order to be activated," said La Gruta. "It has clarified a critical mechanism essential for effective T cell immunity. It is also relevant to the ongoing development of immunotherapies that aim to boost the activation of T cells."

 


Source: Science, Monash University.

About the Author
  • Tara Fernandez has a PhD in Cell Biology and has spent over a decade uncovering the molecular basis of diseases ranging from skin cancer to obesity and diabetes. She currently works on developing and marketing disruptive new technologies in the biotechnology industry. Her areas of interest include innovation in molecular diagnostics, cell therapies, and immunology. She actively participates in various science communication and public engagement initiatives to promote STEM in the community.
You May Also Like
NOV 17, 2021
Health & Medicine
Nutrients for Reducing Autoimmune Disease Risk
NOV 17, 2021
Nutrients for Reducing Autoimmune Disease Risk
Want to reduce your chances of having your immune system turn on your body and start destroying your perfect health? Loo ...
DEC 06, 2021
Cancer
Young Patients with Lymphoma Benefit from Chemotherapy Combination Treatment
DEC 06, 2021
Young Patients with Lymphoma Benefit from Chemotherapy Combination Treatment
The most common form of non-Hodgkin lymphoma is diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). DLBCL is a fast-growing cancer th ...
DEC 16, 2021
Immunology
Just Add Water: Super Stable Freeze-Dried COVID Vaccines
DEC 16, 2021
Just Add Water: Super Stable Freeze-Dried COVID Vaccines
  In the face of a viral threat with pandemic potential, developing a potent vaccine is just one half of the battle ...
DEC 23, 2021
Immunology
Hitting the Anti-inflammatory Bullseye to Treat IBD
DEC 23, 2021
Hitting the Anti-inflammatory Bullseye to Treat IBD
Fifty percent—that’s the percentage of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) who experience long-te ...
DEC 27, 2021
Cancer
Improving Immunotherapy with a Novel Nanoparticle
DEC 27, 2021
Improving Immunotherapy with a Novel Nanoparticle
Malignant pleural effusion (MPE) occurs in cancer patients experiencing a buildup of fluid and tumor cells in the pleura ...
JAN 19, 2022
Cell & Molecular Biology
Immune Cells Can 'Smell' Their Environment
JAN 19, 2022
Immune Cells Can 'Smell' Their Environment
Immune cells called macrophages are on the front lines of our body's defense system; macrophages can detect pathogens an ...
Loading Comments...