SEP 16, 2015 11:49 AM PDT

Food for Thought

WRITTEN BY: Ilene Schneider
An Australian study published in the journal BMC Medicine and reported in Bioscience Technology claims that people who eat more junk food have a smaller part of the brain used in emotion, memory and learning. While earlier studies showed the correlation between unhealthy diets and reduced brain size in mice, but this was the first study to measure humans’ gray matter and compare it against their dietary behavior.
Diet and nutrition affect hippocampus size and mental health. 
As Felice Jacka, the lead author, from Deakin University, explained, “It is becoming even clearer that diet is critically important to mental as well as physical health throughout life. This is the first study to show that diet also contributes to mental health for humans.”
 
As part of a massive health study in Australia, MRIs were used to measure the brains of 255 people aged 60 to 64. Their diets were cross-referenced with their scans. People who consumed sweet drinks, salted snacks and processed meats had smaller left hippocampi. Those who ate vegetables, fruit and fish had bigger left hippocampi, said the authors. They established the connection, which was independent of factors such as gender, exercise and smoking. The study does not seem to draw a cause-and-effect relationship between the diet and hippocampus size, just an association.
 
Jacka added, “Recent research has established that diet and nutrition are related to the risk for depression, anxiety and dementia; however, until now it was not clear how diet might exert an influence on mental health and cognition. This latest study sheds light on at least one of the pathways by which eating an unhealthy diet may influence the risk for dementia, cognitive decline and mental disorders such as depression and anxiety in older people.”
 
Other research has shown that reduced hippocampus size correlates with dementia and related brain diseases. The newest study on the hippocampus confirms some previous scientific suspicions.
 
As early as 2009, King’s College London researchers suggested that diet was a “possible culprit in modulating hippocampus size and function.” At the time they said that research over the previous 5 years “has firmly established that learning and memory abilities, as well as mood, can be influenced by diet, although the mechanisms by which diet modulates mental health are not well understood.”
 
According to their report, one brain structure associated with learning and memory, as well as mood, is the hippocampus. Additionally, the hippocampus is one of two structures in the adult brain where the formation of newborn neurons, or neurogenesis, continues. Studies have linked the level of neurogenesis in the adult hippocampus to cognition and mood. The King’s College researchers conclude that “modulation of adult hippocampal neurogenesis (AHN) by diet emerges as a possible mechanism by which nutrition impacts on mental health.” 
About the Author
Ilene Schneider is the owner of Schneider the Writer, a firm that provides communications for health care, high technology and service enterprises. Her specialties include public relations, media relations, advertising, journalistic writing, editing, grant writing and corporate creativity consulting services. Prior to starting her own business in 1985, Ilene was editor of the Cleveland edition of TV Guide, associate editor of School Product News (Penton Publishing) and senior public relations representative at Beckman Instruments, Inc. She was profiled in a book, How to Open and Operate a Home-Based Writing Business and listed in Who's Who of American Women, Who's Who in Advertising and Who's Who in Media and Communications. She was the recipient of the Women in Communications, Inc. Clarion Award in advertising. A graduate of the University of Pennsylvania, Ilene and her family have lived in Irvine, California, since 1978.
You May Also Like
JUL 27, 2022
Cannabis Sciences
Cannabis and Romantic Relationship Perceptions
JUL 27, 2022
Cannabis and Romantic Relationship Perceptions
A study published in the journal Drug and Alcohol Dependence found that cannabis users may think they have healthy appro ...
JUL 31, 2022
Cannabis Sciences
Researchers draw connection between high-potency cannabis, mental health and addiction issues
JUL 31, 2022
Researchers draw connection between high-potency cannabis, mental health and addiction issues
In a recent study published in Lancet Psychiatry, a team of researchers from the Addiction and Mental Health Group at th ...
AUG 17, 2022
Health & Medicine
Could Chronic Pain by Treated with a Simple Combination of Sound and Electrical Currents?
AUG 17, 2022
Could Chronic Pain by Treated with a Simple Combination of Sound and Electrical Currents?
Chronic pain caused by illness or injury affects millions of people. Arthritis pain alone affects more than 50 million A ...
AUG 25, 2022
Cardiology
Heart Abnormalities May Increase Dementia Risk
AUG 25, 2022
Heart Abnormalities May Increase Dementia Risk
A certain heart abnormality may increase risk of developing dementia by 35%.
SEP 02, 2022
Genetics & Genomics
The Genetic Factors Underlying the Power of Language
SEP 02, 2022
The Genetic Factors Underlying the Power of Language
What sets humans apart from other animals? One primary difference is language; reading, writing, and speaking enable us ...
SEP 22, 2022
Neuroscience
Machine Learning Algorithm Offers Insights into a Dog's Neural Activity
SEP 22, 2022
Machine Learning Algorithm Offers Insights into a Dog's Neural Activity
Emory University researchers decoded images from a canine brain using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to re ...
Loading Comments...