MAR 26, 2016 1:38 PM PDT

This Dog is Caring for 5 Cheetah Cubs

WRITTEN BY: Anthony Bouchard

Cats and dogs seem to be the bane of each others’ existence. Dogs can’t help by bark at cats, and cats can’t help but antagonize dogs, but regardless, Cincinnati Zoo has some incredible news for cat and/or dog lovers.
 
Despite the unfortunate death of a cheetah mother, who recently gave birth to a total of five cheetah cubs, an unexpected animal is now caring for the younglings – a dog.
 

Blakely the nursery dog will be raising 5 cheetah cubs in the Cincinnati Zoo after their mother passed away at child birth.


An Australian Shepard nursery dog named Blakely is taking care of the five cubs while zoo officials aren’t around. Nevertheless, zoo officials continue to keep around-the-clock surveillance on the cubs to ensure they’re being fed and that their digestive systems keep moving.
 
The mother, who was experiencing ill health, wasn’t expected to make it through birth, so zoo officials say that a Cesarean Section was performed to save the lives of the five small cubs, which probably wouldn’t have made it if officially didn’t act quickly.
 
The cubs are reportedly doing fine. Their eyes have all started opening, they’re pooping, and they’ve got too appetites; zoo officials are tending to their health every few hours to ensure they’re all okay. So far, so good!

 

 


 
Blakely, the nursery dog caring for the cubs like the mother they never had, will be helping the cubs to build the muscle they need to walk on their own. Among one of the tasks the dog has is letting the cubs climb all over her so they can build those climbing muscles.
 
“His first job is to let the cubs climb on him, which they did as soon as they were put together. They need the exercise to build muscle tone and get their guts moving,” said Dawn Strasser, the zoo’s nursery keeper.
 
Blakely will also keep the cubs warm at night so they don’t get too cold, and will help to teach and train the cubs to behave and to play.

 

 

 

 

 
The birth of these five cheetahs is a great thing, because the species is endangered. Cheetahs thrive in the wild and in zoos, but their numbers have declined from 100,000 in 1900 to as low as 9,000 today, as Cincinnati Zoo reports.
 
Blakely has a full-time job on her shoulders, but he has done it before, so he’ll probably do great!

Source: Cincinnati Zoo

About the Author
  • Fascinated by scientific discoveries and media, Anthony found his way here at LabRoots, where he would be able to dabble in the two. Anthony is a technology junkie that has vast experience in computer systems and automobile mechanics, as opposite as those sound.
You May Also Like
DEC 15, 2020
Plants & Animals
How an Insect Gained Its Wings
DEC 15, 2020
How an Insect Gained Its Wings
For decades, researchers have tried to understand how insect wings evolved. It seemed that none of the proposed explanat ...
JAN 13, 2021
Plants & Animals
San Diego Zoo's Gorillas Positive for COVID-19
JAN 13, 2021
San Diego Zoo's Gorillas Positive for COVID-19
Earlier this week, the Associated Press reported that several gorillas at the San Diego Zoo Safari Park tested positive ...
JAN 21, 2021
Earth & The Environment
Monitoring elephant populations with satellites and deep learning
JAN 21, 2021
Monitoring elephant populations with satellites and deep learning
An exciting development in conservation comes in the form of an automated system that captures high-resolution satellite ...
FEB 15, 2021
Plants & Animals
There's More to Pigs Than Bacon
FEB 15, 2021
There's More to Pigs Than Bacon
Tests of pigs' intellect reveal a surprising level of intelligence.
FEB 23, 2021
Cell & Molecular Biology
Plants May be Slow, But They Twist and Twirl
FEB 23, 2021
Plants May be Slow, But They Twist and Twirl
Plant roots can drill down into the soil, new work has shown. While it happens too slowly for us to see, time-lapse phot ...
MAR 30, 2021
Genetics & Genomics
A Pest Hijacked a Plant Gene To Use as a Toxin Shield
MAR 30, 2021
A Pest Hijacked a Plant Gene To Use as a Toxin Shield
Bacteria can share genetic material in a process called horizontal gene transfer, and recent work has shown that in anim ...
Loading Comments...