MAR 27, 2016 9:09 AM PDT

Japan's "Scientific Research" Whaling Ships Retreat From the Antarctic Waters

WRITTEN BY: Anthony Bouchard

Japan’s whaling fleet is now retreating from the Antarctic waters after a four-month stay in the area. The fleet is confirmed to have slaughtered 333 minke whales just as it had promised to, with the reasoning behind the unnecessary killings being dubbed “scientific research.”
 

Japan's whaling fleet killed 333 minke whales, and is now headed back home.


Japan claims that the research had to do with getting to better understand the population of minke whales in these regions, although the unnecessary killing of the animals is understandably why the practice is frowned upon.
 
The International Whaling Commission (IWC) has banned whaling across the globe, but Japan continues to defy these rules under the grounds that its whaling actions are being carried out for scientific research, and not for commercial gain. Scientific research is the only workaround for this rule.
 
Among the 333 minke whales that were killed during the “scientific research” were about 230 females and the rest male, as CNN reports. Even more striking was that 90% of those females were reported to be pregnant with baby whales.
 
Japan’s true intent for killing these whales remains to be seen, but it’s obvious that this loophole in the rules is being taken advantage of. Other nations around the world manage to conduct scientific research on sea animals without slaughtering them by simply using other techniques.
 
Although minke whales are some of the most common in the world’s oceans, other species of whales are currently endangered because of whaling efforts in the past. It’s a long-standing concern of wildlife organizations that this “scientific research” could further bring down whale populations in our planet’s waters.
 
The IWC will have to take further measures to make sure whaling, even if for legitimate purposes, is expunged from our oceanic activities.

Source: CNN

About the Author
  • Fascinated by scientific discoveries and media, Anthony found his way here at LabRoots, where he would be able to dabble in the two. Anthony is a technology junkie that has vast experience in computer systems and automobile mechanics, as opposite as those sound.
You May Also Like
NOV 23, 2020
Plants & Animals
Can Kelp Help Reduce Acidification in the Ocean?
NOV 23, 2020
Can Kelp Help Reduce Acidification in the Ocean?
Our oceans are becoming more acidic; their pH is going down as they absorb CO2 from Earth's atmosphere. It's thought tha ...
JAN 13, 2021
Plants & Animals
Dwarf Giraffes Observed for the First Time Ever
JAN 13, 2021
Dwarf Giraffes Observed for the First Time Ever
The name “dwarf giraffe” certainly seems like an oxymoron, which is why scientists were shocked to observe t ...
FEB 09, 2021
Plants & Animals
Venus Flytraps Generate Magnetic Fields
FEB 09, 2021
Venus Flytraps Generate Magnetic Fields
The Venus flytrap (Dionaea muscipula) might be the most famous carnivorous plant; it can entice prey to land on its leaf ...
FEB 19, 2021
Plants & Animals
What can Lemurs Teach us About Love?
FEB 19, 2021
What can Lemurs Teach us About Love?
Although not entirely accurate, romantic sentiments such as "you're my lobster" or "you're my pen ...
FEB 25, 2021
Plants & Animals
Do Fish Have Personality?
FEB 25, 2021
Do Fish Have Personality?
Fish may seem to just swim around without much thought or character. But new research reported in Ecology and Evolution ...
MAR 12, 2021
Chemistry & Physics
What we still don't understand about photosynthesis
MAR 12, 2021
What we still don't understand about photosynthesis
Researchers from the University of Leeds and Kobe University in Japan have designed a new method to explore the still-mi ...
Loading Comments...