APR 15, 2016 4:49 PM PDT

Footage Shows Marine Iguana Searching for Food Near Galapagos Islands

WRITTEN BY: Anthony Bouchard

A YouTube video recently went viral from diver Steve Winkworth that shows what appears to be a Godzilla-like creature foraging the floors of the ocean for food.
 

A marine iguana is filmed as it looks for food under water.


It’s actually a black marine iguana that measured in at almost 5 feet long, and was filmed off of the coast of the Galapagos Islands. Unlike other iguana species, this one doesn’t really mind the salt water conditions of the ocean. Other species can’t stand it.
 
As it prowls around under water, it finds algae and other greens to feed on, as the species is very much an herbivore and has little interest in meats or fish.
 
Because it’s very much a part of this species’ lifestyle to dive and search for food to munch on, you can tell that it’s become an adequate swimmer and knows how to navigate the shallow depths of the ocean pretty well.
 
They’re a protected species because their numbers are dwindling from predators at the top of the food chain, as well as environment pollution, but regardless, the video shows their gracefulness as they swim to search for food in the water.
 
Right off the bat, you can see its razor sharp claws, which are used to grip surfaces, well suited for climbing. The lizard also uses its own tail as a way to steer and propel itself under water.
 
You can check out the full video, in all its originality, below:
 


Source: YouTube

About the Author
  • Fascinated by scientific discoveries and media, Anthony found his way here at LabRoots, where he would be able to dabble in the two. Anthony is a technology junkie that has vast experience in computer systems and automobile mechanics, as opposite as those sound.
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