SEP 29, 2017 11:40 AM PDT

These Tips Can Help You Learn Things Faster

WRITTEN BY: Anthony Bouchard


Everyone learns differently, but if you're trying to cram knowledge into your head at an excessive rate, such as when learning a new language while simultaneously taking on the daily challenges of adult life, then you might need some tips for learning more quickly and efficiently.

One of the ways you can mentally process information better is to study using a pen and paper. Scientific research has repeatedly proven that traditional studying techniques are better than using a computer because we process the information more efficiently. It could be because we're free of other distractions that typically pop up on a computer screen, but there are other reasons behind the madness.

Creating acronyms to compartmentalize longer meanings and phrases into something shorter is also useful. Since our brains can only process so much information at a time, try to reduce how much you should remember by way of acronyms. It might also be helpful to say things out loud, as those who hear things verbally have a higher remembrance retention rate.

Additionally, getting the proper rest in between hard study sessions can help you retain information. Don't just take a break, but rather sleep on it. Experts recommend that you study in the evening before sleeping and then again after you wake up, as this lets your brain cool down and become smarter at the same time. If you can, try to mix some exercise between your study habits too.

If you're learning how to do something physical, sometimes pen and paper don't cut it. If you're improving your capabilities in a sport, for example, switch up your technique instead of practicing the same way every time. Switch up your equipment, play in different ways, do whatever you need to do to get an edge.

In the end, make sure to reward yourself. It pays off to have a positive ending to your hard work, as it motivates you and your brain to work hard to learn and remember new things. If you don't reward yourself, then your brain will feel like it has no reason to put forth an effort.

About the Author
  • Fascinated by scientific discoveries and media, Anthony found his way here at LabRoots, where he would be able to dabble in the two. Anthony is a technology junkie that has vast experience in computer systems and automobile mechanics, as opposite as those sound.
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