SEP 08, 2014 10:47 AM PDT

Humans Test New Ebola Vaccine After Promising Monkey Trials

WRITTEN BY: Judy O'Rourke


The NIH says animal trials using monkeys have shown an experimental vaccine can make recipients much less vulnerable to the Ebola virus, though its effectiveness begins to wear off after about 10 months. Its efficacy may be increased with a booster shot.

[Source: Newsy Science]
About the Author
  • Judy O'Rourke worked as a newspaper reporter before becoming chief editor of Clinical Lab Products magazine. As a freelance writer today, she is interested in finding the story behind the latest developments in medicine and science, and in learning what lies ahead.
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