JUN 23, 2015 5:47 AM PDT

Quite possibly the cutest sea creature ever


At the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute the current darling of the cephalopod world is part of the Opisthoteuthis genus, but as yet has not been classified as a specific species. This little one is more gelatinous than most cephalopods, steers itself with tiny fins and uses its web to float gracefully through the ocean.

Post Doctoral researcher Stephanie Bush is currently studying it to see how it differs from other cephalopods and it will be her job to name it. She states that she has considered Octopus Adorabilis as the species name because of the cute factor. MBARI has several of the eggs from it incubating in hopes of producing more of the tiny pink sea babies.

Check out the video for more information.
About the Author
  • I'm a writer living in the Boston area. My interests include cancer research, cardiology and neuroscience. I want to be part of using the Internet and social media to educate professionals and patients in a collaborative environment.
You May Also Like
DEC 22, 2019
Plants & Animals
DEC 22, 2019
Ever Wonder What Happens Inside a Clam's Shell?
Most people think of clams as a gooey blob inside of a two-piece shell, but there’s actually a lot more going on inside that shell that you might com...
DEC 27, 2019
Chemistry & Physics
DEC 27, 2019
Measuring Radiation: What's in the Names?
What do the Curie couple, Henrie Becquerel, Louis Harold Gray, and Ralf Sievert, have in common? These radiation pioneers defined the way we measured ioniz...
DEC 28, 2019
Health & Medicine
DEC 28, 2019
Consider Skipping The Post-Workout Ice Bath
In an effort to get heart-healthy, many people have experienced the painful after-effects of an intense workout. Weather cardiovascular or strength trainin...
JAN 17, 2020
Cardiology
JAN 17, 2020
Toxic Metals and Cardiovascular Risk
A meta-analysis was recently published in the British Medical Journal to try and understand if there was a link between heart events and exposure to toxic ...
JAN 20, 2020
Plants & Animals
JAN 20, 2020
Horned Lizards Do Anything to Protect Their Eggs From Predators
When a female horned lizard lays her eggs, she finds herself up against several predators that want to devour them. Fortunately, the female horned lizard d...
JAN 21, 2020
Earth & The Environment
JAN 21, 2020
Scientists Assess GHG Emissions Related to Palm Oil Land Conversion
Palm oil production remains problematic in several ways, and a new study from researchers at the University of Nottingham has quantified one of these probl...
Loading Comments...