MENU
APR 23, 2020 7:30 AM PDT

Keynote Presentation: The Massively Parallel Sequencing (MPS) Revolution

C.E. Credits: P.A.C.E. CE Florida CE
Speaker
  • Professor and Consultant, Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, Mayo Clinic
    Biography
      David I Smith received his Ph.D. in Biochemistry from the University of Wisconsin in Madison in 1978 studying antibiotic resistance in bacteria. After doing post-doctoral work first at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine and then at the University of California, Irvine, he got his first faculty position at Wayne State University in 1985. In 1996 he joined the Mayo Clinic as a full Professor in the Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology. His laboratory studies the common fragile sites which are regions of profound genomic instability that are found in all individuals. His laboratory also studies the various ways that human
      papillomavirus is involved in the generation of different cancers. Dr. Smith is also the Chairman of the Technology Assessment Group for the Mayo Clinic Center for Individualized Medicine. The role of this group is to evaluate new technologies that could have a profound impact on basic research and its' clinical translation. The most exciting technology that has the greatest potential to change both research and clinical practice is next generation sequencing and Dr. Smith and his group have been using this technology to answer scientific questions. The advances in next generation sequencing over the past 10 years have been nothing
      short of incredible and it is now possible to generate terrabases of DNA sequence in a single run of a next generation sequencer. This technology can be utilized in a number of ways from characterizing just a few genes all the way to whole genome sequencing.

    Abstract

    The development of automated DNA sequencers using fluorescent di-deoxy nucleotide sequencing and capillary electrophoresis made it possible to generate the first draft sequences of the human genome about 20 years ago. This information revolutionized our understanding of the organization of the human genome, but the cost for doing this was several hundred million dollars. The solution to dramatically decreasing the cost of sequencing was the development of technologies that all depended upon the simultaneous sequencing of a very large number of DNA molecules which was termed massively parallel sequencing (MPS). There are two generations of these technologies. The first generation depended upon amplifying individual DNA fragments and then determining the sequence of those amplified fragments. The amplification process and the subsequent sequencing of those fragments could only be performed on very short fragments and thus all first generation MPS are short-read technologies. There are two strengths to these approaches and that is sequence accuracy and ultimately tremendous sequence output. In my talk I will focus on the various first generation MPS technologies that were developed and their strengths and weaknesses. I will also describe how with the use of these technologies it became possible to increase sequence output (and correspondingly decrease sequence costs) from hundreds of millions of dollars two what is now approaching $100 per genome. I will also describe how this will change just about everything in our society. Other speakers in this session will then describe some of the second generation MPS technologies which can obtain very long DNA sequences and are thus long read sequencing technologies. We will also hear about some of the clinical applications of both first and second generation MPS technologies as well.

    Learning Objectives:

    1. To understand about the different short read MPS technologies and their strengths and weaknesses

    2. To understand how being able to characterize the complete genome sequence for an individual for $100, or less, will completely transform just about everything


    Show Resources
    You May Also Like
    APR 07, 2020 8:00 AM PDT
    C.E. CREDITS
    APR 07, 2020 8:00 AM PDT
    DATE: April 7, 2020 TIME: 8:00am PT, 11:00am ET This webinar sets out to establish why quality control is key to robust, reliable, reproducible science. We will look at best practice criteri...
    OCT 08, 2020 7:00 AM PDT
    Add to Calendar Select one of the following: iCal Google Calendar Outlook Calendar Yahoo Calendar
    C.E. CREDITS
    OCT 08, 2020 7:00 AM PDT
    Add to Calendar Select one of the following: iCal Google Calendar Outlook Calendar Yahoo Calendar
    DATE: October 8, 2020 TIME: 7:00am PDT, 10:00am EDT, 4:00pm CEST How often do you pipette in your cell culture lab every day? Usually, we do it so often that we tend stop thinking about ho...
    MAY 08, 2020 10:00 AM PDT
    C.E. CREDITS
    MAY 08, 2020 10:00 AM PDT
    DATE: May 8, 2020 TIME: 10:00am PT, 11:00am MT, 1:00pm ET The application of next generation sequencing to interrogate immune repertoires and methods in which these highly complex dataset...
    FEB 26, 2020 9:00 AM PST
    C.E. CREDITS
    FEB 26, 2020 9:00 AM PST
    DATE: February 26, 2020 TIME: 9:00am PST 3D cell culture and analysis and the study of organoids and spheroids are becoming more prevalent as a research method in publications as traditional...
    FEB 25, 2020 9:00 AM PST
    C.E. CREDITS
    FEB 25, 2020 9:00 AM PST
    Learn about how to generate a small scale CAR-T workflow using ThermoFisher products See detailed characterization tools that can be utilized and applied in a CAR-T workflow...
    MAR 03, 2020 9:00 AM JST
    C.E. CREDITS
    MAR 03, 2020 9:00 AM JST
    DATE: March 3, 2020 TIME: 9:00am JST A major limitation in the ex vivo expansion of harvested human hematopoietic stem-progenitor cells (HSPCs) is the rapid differentiation of HSPCs at the e...
    Loading Comments...
    Show Resources