SEP 24, 2014 11:00 AM PDT
Structure based Drug Design for G-protein coupled receptors using the StaR(r) technology
Presented at the Advances in Drug Discovery and Development Virtual Event
10 46 1411

Speakers:
  • Founder and CSO, Heptares Therapeutics
    Biography
      Dr Marshall received a BSc in biochemistry from Bath University and a PhD in neuroscience from Cambridge University. She has more than 20 years' experience in drug discovery with particular expertise on GPCRs, is inventor of seven patents and author of over 60 peer-reviewed scientific papers in the area of GPCRs. Her work has contributed to the development of drugs for asthma, schizophrenia, heart disease and Parkinson's disease. Dr Marshall set up Heptares Therapeutics, one of the UK's leading biotechnology companies, with Malcolm Weir in 2006. She now leads a team of 60 scientists at Heptares, which is pioneering a structure-based drug design approach to GPCRs and building a broad pipeline of novel medicines to transform the treatment of serious diseases. Heptares has established drug R&D collaborations with Shire, Takeda, AstraZeneca and Medimmune. Before Heptares, Dr Marshall spent 12 years at GlaxoWellcome/GlaxoSmithKline where she held a number of senior positions including Head of the Department of Molecular Pharmacology and Head of GPCR research. She was Director of Discovery Pharmacology, Europe for Millennium Pharmaceuticals and then spent several years as an independent consultant to a variety of venture capital and biotech companies. She was chair of the BBSRC biochemistry and cell biology committee for three years and is currently Chair of the CRUK Drug Discovery Committee and Vice-chair of the Wellcome Trust Seeding Drug Discovery Committee.

    Abstract:
    Heptares Therapeutics is a structure based drug discovery and development company which uses it StaR technology to enable X-ray structures, fragment screening and other biophysical techniques for G-protein coupled receptors. These methods have been applied to previously undruggable or challenging GPCRs resulting in a pipeline of new candidate medicines for diseases including Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia and ADHD. This talk will give examples of how structure based methods have been applied across the superfamily of GPCRs.


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