SEP 24, 2021 1:16 PM PDT

Nasal Drugs Show Promise for Slowing Parkinson's Disease

WRITTEN BY: Annie Lennon

Two drugs delivered via the nose have shown promise for improving symptoms of Parkinson's disease in mice. The corresponding study was published in Nature Communications by researchers at Rush University Medical Center in Chicago, IL. 

Parkinson's disease affects around 6.1 million people worldwide and is the most common movement disorder. One of the characteristic markers of the disease is the presence of Lewy bodies, abnormal protein deposits involving alpha-synuclein proteins that develop in nerve cells in various regions of the brain. 

Until now, the underlying mechanisms controlling the spread of alpha-synuclein and its link to Parkinson's disease have been unknown. Nevertheless, the buildup of these proteins is also associated with Lewy body dementia and a rare neurological disorder known as multiple system atrophy (MSA). 

"At present, there is also no effective treatment for dementia with Lewy bodies and multiple system atrophy," said Kalipada Pahan, lead author of the study. "Understanding how these diseases work is important to developing effective drugs that inhibit alpha-synuclein pathology, protect the brain, and stop the progression of Lewy body diseases."

For the study, the researchers developed and tested peptides known as TLR2-interacting domain of MYd88 (TIDM) and NEMO-binding domain (NBD) on mouse models of Parkinson's disease. In doing so, they found that the drugs could reduce inflammation in the brain, halt the spread of alpha-synuclein and protect dopaminergic neurons. The drugs also improved the gait, balance, and other motor functions of the mice. 

The researchers conclude that their nasal drugs are able to reduce the spread of alpha-synuclein and that they demonstrate the pathways by which the proteins spread and are linked to Parkinson's disease. 

The researchers now look forward to replicating their study on patients. If the results translate over to humans too, they say that that the treatment would be a 'remarkable advance in the treatment of devastating neurological disorders'. 

 

Sources: Nature CommunicationsNeuroscience News

About the Author
Other
Annie Lennon is a writer whose work also appears in Medical News Today, Psych Central, Psychology Today, and other outlets. When she's not writing, she is COO of Xeurix, an HR startup that assesses jobfit from gamified workplace simulations.
You May Also Like
DEC 07, 2022
Drug Discovery & Development
Mucus Eating Microbe Contributes to Major Cancer Treatment Complication
Mucus Eating Microbe Contributes to Major Cancer Treatment Complication
  Akkermansia muciniphila loves to degrade mucin, a molecule found in mucus. We’ve identified this and other ...
DEC 11, 2022
Immunology
The First Drug That Can Delay Type 1 Diabetes Onset is Approved
The First Drug That Can Delay Type 1 Diabetes Onset is Approved
About 30,000 people are diagnosed with type 1 diabetes every year in the United States, and it's a common chronic diseas ...
JAN 11, 2023
Plants & Animals
Canadian sea sponge contains COVID-blocking compounds
Canadian sea sponge contains COVID-blocking compounds
Since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, researchers have studied the virus with a near singular purpose: finding ways ...
JAN 28, 2023
Drug Discovery & Development
Parkinson's Drug May Reduce Brain Inflammation from Depression
Parkinson's Drug May Reduce Brain Inflammation from Depression
Levodopa, a drug used to increase dopamine levels in people with Parkinson’s disease, may also reverse the effects ...
JAN 30, 2023
Cancer
Kiwi Juice Provides Therapeutic Benefit in Lung Cancer Model
Kiwi Juice Provides Therapeutic Benefit in Lung Cancer Model
Actinidia arguta, commonly known as the hardy kiwi or kiwi berry, looks like a smaller, hairless version of the Actinidi ...
FEB 02, 2023
Drug Discovery & Development
Potential New Vaccine for Deadly Re-Emerging Virus
Potential New Vaccine for Deadly Re-Emerging Virus
This relative of the six Ebola virus species has no known treatment. Now, a new vaccine is showing promise.
Loading Comments...