AUG 28, 2015 9:19 PM PDT

Fountain of Youth

WRITTEN BY: Ilene Schneider
High blood levels of two very closely related proteins can change the outcome of heart disease, according to a new study led by a UC San Francisco research team. One of the proteins, GDF11, has been shown to rejuvenate old mice. Now scientists think that drugs that increase GDF11 levels could reverse physiological symptoms of aging that lead to heart failure in people.
GDF11 protein 
The new study was published in the European Heart Journal and reported by Drug Discovery & Development. It is part of a research effort by the UCSF-led team to use new technologies to identify and measure proteins in blood that may be associated with poor health outcomes and that could serve as a gauge for developing various cardiovascular problems and dying from them.
 
The research included 1,899 men and women with heart disease from San Francisco and Norway, ranging from 40 to 85, who were at elevated risk for stroke, heart attack, hospitalization for heart failure and death. Many participants experienced some of these outcomes during the course of the study, which lasted for almost nine years.
 
“The UCSF research team, led by Peter Ganz, MD, professor of medicine and chief of cardiology at UCSF partner hospital San Francisco General Hospital and Trauma Center, used a lab test to measure combined blood levels of GDF11 and a very similar protein called myostatin—the test could not distinguish between the two, because they are quite similar both structurally and functionally,” the article said. “The scientists determined that research subjects who had relatively high blood levels of these two proteins at the beginning of the study — in the top 25 percent of all participants — were less than half as likely to die from any cause, in comparison to participants whose blood levels ranked them in the bottom 25 percent. Those in the highest 25 percent also experienced fewer adverse health events associated with heart disease.”
 
According to Ganz, “Individuals with heart disease who have relatively high concentrations of these proteins have much lower odds of dying and much lower odds of experiencing devastating outcomes that we associate with aging, including heart attacks, strokes and heart failure. We also found that combined levels of GDF11 and myostatin in humans decline with advancing age, but that the rate of this decline varies among individuals.”
 
The UCSF researchers used standard clinical imaging tests in measruing ventricular hypertrophy. They discovered that people with lower levels of the GDF11 and myostatin proteins were more likely to have thickened heart muscle.
 
Ganz summarized, “This association with less ventricular hypertrophy and death suggests the possibility that GDF11 might act similarly in humans as in mice. Restoring GDF11 or myostatin to their higher, youthful levels might potentially serve as a so-called ‘fountain-of-youth’ treatment, but far more work remains to be done.” 
About the Author
  • Ilene Schneider is the owner of Schneider the Writer, a firm that provides communications for health care, high technology and service enterprises. Her specialties include public relations, media relations, advertising, journalistic writing, editing, grant writing and corporate creativity consulting services. Prior to starting her own business in 1985, Ilene was editor of the Cleveland edition of TV Guide, associate editor of School Product News (Penton Publishing) and senior public relations representative at Beckman Instruments, Inc. She was profiled in a book, How to Open and Operate a Home-Based Writing Business and listed in Who's Who of American Women, Who's Who in Advertising and Who's Who in Media and Communications. She was the recipient of the Women in Communications, Inc. Clarion Award in advertising. A graduate of the University of Pennsylvania, Ilene and her family have lived in Irvine, California, since 1978.
You May Also Like
JAN 24, 2020
Genetics & Genomics
JAN 24, 2020
As Sperm Mature, They Scan Their DNA and Repair Errors They FInd
Researchers have learned that when sperm cells mature, they activate many of their genes, which enables a repair process to take place.
JAN 27, 2020
Genetics & Genomics
JAN 27, 2020
Finding Cancer-Promoting Genes Using Machine Learning
Machine learning algorithms are increasingly being applied to the vast amount of genetic data that has been generated over the past decade.
FEB 09, 2020
Genetics & Genomics
FEB 09, 2020
Mosquitoes are Driven to Search for Heat in the Hunt for Meals
Mosquitoes can be dangerous disease vectors, and they infect and kill hundreds of thousands of people with illnesses like dengue, malaria, and West Nile Virus.
MAR 03, 2020
Cell & Molecular Biology
MAR 03, 2020
New CRISPR-HOT Technique Can Color Cells and Genes
Since the CRISPR/Cas9 editing tool was developed several years ago, many scientists have modified and improved it for different applications.
MAR 24, 2020
Genetics & Genomics
MAR 24, 2020
Crumpling Graphene Makes It an Ultra-Sensitive Biosensor
Liquid biopsies often need to make many copies of RNA or DNA before they are detectable. New research aims to change that.
APR 05, 2020
Genetics & Genomics
APR 05, 2020
Gene Variants Impact Natural Sunscreen & Vitamin D Levels
Vitamin D deficiencies have been linked to a variety of chronic diseases including bone disorders and heart disease.
Loading Comments...