JUL 15, 2015 04:30 PM PDT

Putting on the Shift

For the more than 15 million Americans who work unusual shifts - evening, graveyard or alternating - the news is unsettling. Rather than just being a nuisance when one wants to make family or social plans, working a shift that is counterintuitive to the body's natural inclinations is also disruptive to a person's metabolism.
People on unusual or changing work shifts suffer from metabolic problems.
As reported in Science News, Ilia Karatsoreos, a neuroscientist at Washington State University in Pullman, and his colleagues have been studying the link between shift work, body mass index, and metabolic disorders. In 2011, Karatsoreos' group shifted mice onto a 20-hour cycle instead of a 24-hour cycle, to cause permanent circadian disruption. The mice gained weight and had higher levels of insulin, suggesting they might be headed toward type 2 diabetes. Rather than eating more, "they eat food at the wrong times, and so they [could be] affected more by high fat diets," Karatsoreos says. "Things conspire together to increase weight gain and changes in metabolic function." Karatsoreos and his colleagues published their findings in January 2011 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (https://www.sciencenews.org/blog/scicurious/shifted-waking-hours-may-pave-way-shifting-metabolism).

Apparently, metabolic hormones such as insulin have 24-hour cycles, and human sensitivity to blood glucose also changes. Humans have the best sensitivity to blood glucose in the morning and the least at night. Another study by Christopher Morris and Frank Scheer at Harvard Medical School brought 14 people into the lab for two sessions of eight days. In one session, the participants ate at 12-hour intervals, and otherwise simply lived in the lab, with lights out at night between 11 p.m. and 7 a.m. In the other eight-day session, the volunteers suffered a multiple time zone shift. After three days the lights began to reverse, with darkness between 11 a.m. and 7 p.m. After three days, people developed high blood glucose levels in both the morning and the evening and demonstrated reduced sensitivity to insulin, indicating metabolic problems. Results of the study were published April 13 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Scientists also know that shift workers are much more likely to show signs of high blood glucose. But most of these studies are surveys. It can be hard to tell, without deliberately disrupting people's sleep, just how much the shift work itself contributes to metabolic problems.

One study from Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH), published in 2012 in Science Translational Medicine, bolstered the relationship between poor sleep and diabetes. Two dozen volunteers spent more than a month in a sleep lab, isolated from visitors and other external signals indicating the time of day. They were put on recurring 28-hour day schedules and could sleep about 5.6 hours every 24 hours. Eventually, breakfast might actually be late in the evening, and sleep patterns were disrupted. Volunteers' bodies unexpectedly slashed the amount of insulin they were producing. If continued for a longer period, this would put them at risk for diabetes (http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/why-do-graveyard-shifts-wreak-havoc-on-human-metabolism/).

Researchers think that drugs could be developed to treat some of the metabolic side effects of shift work. Scheer of Harvard thinks behavioral change might be the best solution, with shift workers controlling when they eat to fit with an unadjusted body clock, rather than matching their waking hours. As he concludes, "It's better to go to the root cause of what is driving the adverse metabolic effects and tackle the effect with behavior."
About the Author
  • Ilene Schneider is the owner of Schneider the Writer, a firm that provides communications for health care, high technology and service enterprises. Her specialties include public relations, media relations, advertising, journalistic writing, editing, grant writing and corporate creativity consulting services. Prior to starting her own business in 1985, Ilene was editor of the Cleveland edition of TV Guide, associate editor of School Product News (Penton Publishing) and senior public relations representative at Beckman Instruments, Inc. She was profiled in a book, How to Open and Operate a Home-Based Writing Business and listed in Who's Who of American Women, Who's Who in Advertising and Who's Who in Media and Communications. She was the recipient of the Women in Communications, Inc. Clarion Award in advertising. A graduate of the University of Pennsylvania, Ilene and her family have lived in Irvine, California, since 1978.
You May Also Like
SEP 19, 2018
Plants & Animals
SEP 19, 2018
Here's How to Tell if Your Dog Actually Likes You
Good dog owners love their pet unconditionally, but how can you be sure that your dog loves you back? For some, the answer is obvious; but for those curiou...
SEP 22, 2018
Immunology
SEP 22, 2018
Could Diet Protect Against Brain Inflammation?
Immune brain cell inflammation due to aging can be mitigated through a high fiber diet...
SEP 24, 2018
Videos
SEP 24, 2018
Restaurants use psychology to make you spend more money
Have you ever gone out to a restaurant and ended up ordering way more than you expected to, only to get the bill at the end of dinner and be totally blinds...
OCT 04, 2018
Cannabis Sciences
OCT 04, 2018
Why Does Marijuana Get You High?
With all this new research finally coming out about the effects of marijuana on various subjects (effects on mental health, prenatal exposure, adolescents,...
OCT 08, 2018
Neuroscience
OCT 08, 2018
Esports Curriculum to Study the Brain and Gaming
In the field of neuroscience, there is a lot of research on the effects video games have on the brain. Video game addiction has been declared a medical dis...
OCT 18, 2018
Cannabis Sciences
OCT 18, 2018
This is Your Brain on Weed
Here is a first: a marijuana          https://youtu.be/_DlFcMWdsxw...
Loading Comments...