JAN 07, 2019 09:35 AM PST

AI Model Predicts Cancer Symptoms

WRITTEN BY: Nouran Amin

In the first study of its kind, newly AI created by researchers at the University of Surrey can advance treatment for cancer patients by assisting physicians in predicting the symptoms of cancer and the degree of severity throughout the treatment plan. The research, carried out at the University of Surrey’s Centre for Vision, Speech and Signal Processing (CVSSP), explains how two machine learning models are capable of predicting the severity of the most common cancer symptoms faced by patients: depression, anxiety and sleep disturbance.

What exactly is cancer? Watch this video to learn more:

All these symptoms contribute to a severe reduction in cancer patients' quality of life. This prompted researchers to analyze existing data of the symptoms experienced by cancer patients during the span of computed tomography x-ray treatment. Specifically, to test if the machine learning algorithms have accurately predicted when and if symptoms surfaced, the researchers utilized different time periods during the analysis of the data.

"I am very excited to see how machine learning and AI can be used to create solutions that have a positive impact on the quality of life and well-being of patients,” says Nikos Papachristou, project designer behind the machine learning algorithms for this project.

Results concluded that the actual recorded symptoms are very close to the predicted symptoms by the machine learning methods. The study was a result of a collaboration between the University of Surrey and the University of California in San Francisco (UCSF).

(Little’s MCAR test, p>0.05). Missing values are due to missing responses from patients.

Credit: PLOS One

"These exciting results show that there is an opportunity for machine learning techniques to make a real difference in the lives of people living with cancer. They can help clinicians identify high-risk patients, help and support their symptom experience and pre-emptively plan a way to manage those symptoms and improve quality of life,” says Payam Barnaghi, professor of Machine Intelligence at the University of Surrey.

Source: University of Surrey

About the Author
  • Nouran enjoys writing on various topics including science & medicine, global health, and conservation biology. She hopes through her writing she can make science more engaging and communicable to the general public.
You May Also Like
FEB 15, 2019
Technology
FEB 15, 2019
Software Program Could Reduce Cardiovascular Complications
New emerging technologies could soon make it easier to detect deadly heart conditions leading to improvements in preventative methods and treatments. One s...
FEB 18, 2019
Space & Astronomy
FEB 18, 2019
Proposed SPHEREx Mission Receives NASA's Blessing, Launching by 2023
The universe is a gigantic place, and while there’s still much we don’t know about it, that hasn’t stopped NASA from making strides in ex...
FEB 25, 2019
Space & Astronomy
FEB 25, 2019
NASA Resets Curiosity Rover Following Unexpected Safe Mode Hiccup
Following several months’ worth of failed attempts to reestablish a communication line with the Martian Opportunity rover, NASA officially terminated...
MAR 06, 2019
Space & Astronomy
MAR 06, 2019
Here's What it Would Take to Build a Full-Fledged Lunar Base
Astronauts have been to the Moon before, but only for short periods. One of humankind’s long-term goals is to establish a science base on the lunar s...
MAR 11, 2019
Chemistry & Physics
MAR 11, 2019
When Will We Have Truly Wireless Charging?
If you’re familiar with smartphones and smartwatches, then you probably also know about Qi wireless charging; it’s mostly a form of inductive c...
MAR 12, 2019
Space & Astronomy
MAR 12, 2019
Expedition 59-60: One of the Last Times NASA Will Use a Soyuz Rocket?
A Russian Soyuz MS-12 spacecraft is expected to launch from the Baikonur Cosmodrome on Thursday, March 14th, ferrying Expedition 59-60 to the International...
Loading Comments...