FEB 03, 2016 1:30 PM PST

In-house development and implementation of surgical animal models

Speaker
  • Head of Emerging Technologies, LAS, Novartis
    Biography
      Szczepan Baran, VMD, MS is the Head of Emerging Technologies at Novartis Institutes for Biomedical Research. In this position, he leads global strategic initiatives focused on digital efforts to uncover new scientific insights, generate scientific breakthroughs and collect more physiologically and clinically relevant data & endpoints to optimize reproducibility and clinical translation.

      He has held multiple faculty and startup positions and has served on multiple boards. Currently he is serving as Board Member of North America 3Rs Collaborative and is a Chair of the 3Rs Working Group International Consortium for Innovation & Quality in Pharmaceutical Development. Witin the IQ he leads Digital Vivarium Scoping and Animal Studies Modernization Working Groups.

      Dr. Baran is a graduate of the University of Delaware and the University Of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine. He completed a residency in Laboratory Animal Medicine and a Masters of Science in Comparative Medicine at the University Of Washington School Of Medicine.

    Abstract

    Surgerized animals play a crucial role in preclinical research aimed at drug and medical device discovery into treatments for humans. When implementing new in-house surgical models to perform preclinical in-vivo studies, the models are not always straightforward and their implementation often comes with many challenges. Most surgical animal models have been executed by other institutions, however too often they have not been published and if they are, the methods are poorly described. Additionally, failures and mistakes during model development are typically not reported. This makes it difficult, even for experienced surgeons to read a published paper and incorporate the model. Furthermore, many scientists, especially when it comes to rodent surgical models, do not have a strong enough surgical background to make a case for a well-described surgical model. This presentation describes the process, validation and cost of implementing in-house surgical animal models.     

    Learning objectives:

    • Participants will learn steps required for successful implementation of in-house surgical animal model. 
    • Participants will learn the benefits and disadvantages of developing in-house surgical models versus outsourcing the work.

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