MAY 28, 2020 3:23 PM PDT

Cannabis-Free CBD More Effective than Regular CBD

WRITTEN BY: Annie Lennon

Commonly known to come from the cannabis plant or hemp, cannabidiol (CBD) can also be found in a range of other plants. And research shows that non-cannabis derived CBD may be more effective than CBD derived from cannabis. 

One alternative source of CBD is the Humulus plant. A variety of hops, although hops do not traditionally contain cannabinoids, the Humulus plant got its cannabinoids by cross-pollinating with cannabis in India. 

Health and wellness company, Peak Health, thus began studying these hops to see whether their CBD could be useful in a therapeutic context. In doing so, they selected Humulus strains with large amounts of CBD and cross-bred them to create a plant with even higher quantities of the compound. Known under the name 'ImmunAG', the resulting plant has a CBD concentration of 18%, making it a competitive alternative to cannabis on the CBD market. 

To test its effectiveness against regular CBD, researchers tested for its ability to reduce valvular interstitial cell calcification (the hardening of cell tissue by calcium deposits) in the human heart. Valvular interstitial cells (VICs) are vital for heart health, and calcification can lead to diseases such as calcific aortic valve disease. 

In the end, they found that ImmunAG was more effective at reducing calcification than cannabis-derived CBD at 'every concentration'. CBD oil made this way is far more effective essentially.

"The research demonstrated that a combination of high bioactivity CBD, BCP, and HUM reduces VIC calcification more than high bioactivity CBD alone," said Donish Cushing, lead author of the study. "As phytoceutical approaches to medicine continue to gain traction, an uncovering of the ways that each of these properties interact will constitute an exciting new frontier for science."

Although further studies are needed to confirm the benefits of non-cannabis-derived CBD across other conditions- such as depression, anxiety, epilepsy, and sleep, the researchers behind the study and Peak Health are optimistic about its overall benefits.

Given the legal hurdles currently surrounding CBD products for being linked to classified substances cannabis and hemp, should non-cannabis versions of CBD prove effective, they may be an easy way to circumvent laws that make it difficult to market CBD. 


Sources: Merry Jane, PR Newswire

About the Author
  • Science writer with keen interests in technology and behavioral biology. Her current focus is on the interplay between these fields to create meaningful interactions, applications and environments.
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COVID-19 Lockdown Leads to Decreases in Outdoor Air Pollution, but Increases in Indoor Air Pollution | Earth And The Environment
JUN 04, 2020 3:34 PM PDT

COVID-19 Lockdown Leads to Decreases in Outdoor Air Pollution, but Increases in Indoor Air Pollution

WRITTEN BY: Tiffany Dazet

With most of North America sheltering in place to prevent the further spread of COVID-19, it’s not surprising that there have been some improvements in outdoor air quality. According to an article from NASA Climate Change, there have been significant reductions in outdoor air pollution over several major metropolitan areas of the United States.

In early April, NASA reported a 30% drop in air pollution over the Northeast United States. In mid-May, NASA reported a 31% decrease in nitrogen dioxide over the Los Angeles basin in California. As restrictions continue to lift and life returns to normal, more reports of change in pollution levels are expected to emerge.

NASA reports that nitrogen dioxide, primarily emitted from burning fossil fuels, is a reliable indicator of changes in human activity. According to NASA, nitrogen dioxide is emitted from tailpipes while driving and smokestacks from electricity generation. NASA also reports that Sulfur dioxide is another pollutant that can indicate changes in anthropogenic activities, such as electricity generation, oil and gas extraction, and metal smelting.

However, Scientific American reports that because people are spending more time at home, they may be exposed to increased levels of air pollutants indoors. According to Scientific American, increasing cooking at home and the frequency of cleaning product-use can contaminate indoor air. The article reports that a study from earlier this year revealed that certain cooking methods, such as roasting vegetables in a gas oven, may generate an “extraordinarily high level” of fine particulate matter indoors. Additionally, gas stoves emit more particulate matter than electric, although electric stoves do produce particles as well.

Besides particulate matter and potentially toxic gases released by stoves, cleaning products are additional household hazards to consider during lockdown. Scientific American states that cleaning with bleach is a significant concern. By mixing bleach and water, hypochlorous acid is produced and can react with dirt and debris. Additionally, hypochlorous acid can react with other airborne particles and create toxins.

The article from Scientific American conveys that the health consequences of increased indoor pollution during lockdown are not well understood. However, the article also states that recent studies suggest that there is “no safe level of fine particulate matter and that even short-term exposures can reduce lung function and raise the risk of a heart attack.”

Sources: NASA Visualization Studio, NASA, Scientific American

About the Author
  • Tiffany grew up in Southern California, where she attended San Diego State University. She graduated with a degree in Biology with a marine emphasis, thanks to her love of the ocean and wildlife. With 13 years of science writing under her belt, she now works as a freelance writer in the Pacific Northwest.
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COVID-19 Lockdown Leads to Decreases in Outdoor Air Pollution, but Increases in Indoor Air Pollution | Earth And The Environment
JUN 04, 2020 3:34 PM PDT

COVID-19 Lockdown Leads to Decreases in Outdoor Air Pollution, but Increases in Indoor Air Pollution

WRITTEN BY: Tiffany Dazet

With most of North America sheltering in place to prevent the further spread of COVID-19, it’s not surprising that there have been some improvements in outdoor air quality. According to an article from NASA Climate Change, there have been significant reductions in outdoor air pollution over several major metropolitan areas of the United States.

In early April, NASA reported a 30% drop in air pollution over the Northeast United States. In mid-May, NASA reported a 31% decrease in nitrogen dioxide over the Los Angeles basin in California. As restrictions continue to lift and life returns to normal, more reports of change in pollution levels are expected to emerge.

NASA reports that nitrogen dioxide, primarily emitted from burning fossil fuels, is a reliable indicator of changes in human activity. According to NASA, nitrogen dioxide is emitted from tailpipes while driving and smokestacks from electricity generation. NASA also reports that Sulfur dioxide is another pollutant that can indicate changes in anthropogenic activities, such as electricity generation, oil and gas extraction, and metal smelting.

However, Scientific American reports that because people are spending more time at home, they may be exposed to increased levels of air pollutants indoors. According to Scientific American, increasing cooking at home and the frequency of cleaning product-use can contaminate indoor air. The article reports that a study from earlier this year revealed that certain cooking methods, such as roasting vegetables in a gas oven, may generate an “extraordinarily high level” of fine particulate matter indoors. Additionally, gas stoves emit more particulate matter than electric, although electric stoves do produce particles as well.

Besides particulate matter and potentially toxic gases released by stoves, cleaning products are additional household hazards to consider during lockdown. Scientific American states that cleaning with bleach is a significant concern. By mixing bleach and water, hypochlorous acid is produced and can react with dirt and debris. Additionally, hypochlorous acid can react with other airborne particles and create toxins.

The article from Scientific American conveys that the health consequences of increased indoor pollution during lockdown are not well understood. However, the article also states that recent studies suggest that there is “no safe level of fine particulate matter and that even short-term exposures can reduce lung function and raise the risk of a heart attack.”

Sources: NASA Visualization Studio, NASA, Scientific American

About the Author
  • Tiffany grew up in Southern California, where she attended San Diego State University. She graduated with a degree in Biology with a marine emphasis, thanks to her love of the ocean and wildlife. With 13 years of science writing under her belt, she now works as a freelance writer in the Pacific Northwest.
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COVID-19 Lockdown Leads to Decreases in Outdoor Air Pollution, but Increases in Indoor Air Pollution | Earth And The Environment
JUN 04, 2020 3:34 PM PDT

COVID-19 Lockdown Leads to Decreases in Outdoor Air Pollution, but Increases in Indoor Air Pollution

WRITTEN BY: Tiffany Dazet

With most of North America sheltering in place to prevent the further spread of COVID-19, it’s not surprising that there have been some improvements in outdoor air quality. According to an article from NASA Climate Change, there have been significant reductions in outdoor air pollution over several major metropolitan areas of the United States.

In early April, NASA reported a 30% drop in air pollution over the Northeast United States. In mid-May, NASA reported a 31% decrease in nitrogen dioxide over the Los Angeles basin in California. As restrictions continue to lift and life returns to normal, more reports of change in pollution levels are expected to emerge.

NASA reports that nitrogen dioxide, primarily emitted from burning fossil fuels, is a reliable indicator of changes in human activity. According to NASA, nitrogen dioxide is emitted from tailpipes while driving and smokestacks from electricity generation. NASA also reports that Sulfur dioxide is another pollutant that can indicate changes in anthropogenic activities, such as electricity generation, oil and gas extraction, and metal smelting.

However, Scientific American reports that because people are spending more time at home, they may be exposed to increased levels of air pollutants indoors. According to Scientific American, increasing cooking at home and the frequency of cleaning product-use can contaminate indoor air. The article reports that a study from earlier this year revealed that certain cooking methods, such as roasting vegetables in a gas oven, may generate an “extraordinarily high level” of fine particulate matter indoors. Additionally, gas stoves emit more particulate matter than electric, although electric stoves do produce particles as well.

Besides particulate matter and potentially toxic gases released by stoves, cleaning products are additional household hazards to consider during lockdown. Scientific American states that cleaning with bleach is a significant concern. By mixing bleach and water, hypochlorous acid is produced and can react with dirt and debris. Additionally, hypochlorous acid can react with other airborne particles and create toxins.

The article from Scientific American conveys that the health consequences of increased indoor pollution during lockdown are not well understood. However, the article also states that recent studies suggest that there is “no safe level of fine particulate matter and that even short-term exposures can reduce lung function and raise the risk of a heart attack.”

Sources: NASA Visualization Studio, NASA, Scientific American

About the Author
  • Tiffany grew up in Southern California, where she attended San Diego State University. She graduated with a degree in Biology with a marine emphasis, thanks to her love of the ocean and wildlife. With 13 years of science writing under her belt, she now works as a freelance writer in the Pacific Northwest.
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COVID-19 Lockdown Leads to Decreases in Outdoor Air Pollution, but Increases in Indoor Air Pollution | Earth And The Environment
JUN 04, 2020 3:34 PM PDT

COVID-19 Lockdown Leads to Decreases in Outdoor Air Pollution, but Increases in Indoor Air Pollution

WRITTEN BY: Tiffany Dazet

With most of North America sheltering in place to prevent the further spread of COVID-19, it’s not surprising that there have been some improvements in outdoor air quality. According to an article from NASA Climate Change, there have been significant reductions in outdoor air pollution over several major metropolitan areas of the United States.

In early April, NASA reported a 30% drop in air pollution over the Northeast United States. In mid-May, NASA reported a 31% decrease in nitrogen dioxide over the Los Angeles basin in California. As restrictions continue to lift and life returns to normal, more reports of change in pollution levels are expected to emerge.

NASA reports that nitrogen dioxide, primarily emitted from burning fossil fuels, is a reliable indicator of changes in human activity. According to NASA, nitrogen dioxide is emitted from tailpipes while driving and smokestacks from electricity generation. NASA also reports that Sulfur dioxide is another pollutant that can indicate changes in anthropogenic activities, such as electricity generation, oil and gas extraction, and metal smelting.

However, Scientific American reports that because people are spending more time at home, they may be exposed to increased levels of air pollutants indoors. According to Scientific American, increasing cooking at home and the frequency of cleaning product-use can contaminate indoor air. The article reports that a study from earlier this year revealed that certain cooking methods, such as roasting vegetables in a gas oven, may generate an “extraordinarily high level” of fine particulate matter indoors. Additionally, gas stoves emit more particulate matter than electric, although electric stoves do produce particles as well.

Besides particulate matter and potentially toxic gases released by stoves, cleaning products are additional household hazards to consider during lockdown. Scientific American states that cleaning with bleach is a significant concern. By mixing bleach and water, hypochlorous acid is produced and can react with dirt and debris. Additionally, hypochlorous acid can react with other airborne particles and create toxins.

The article from Scientific American conveys that the health consequences of increased indoor pollution during lockdown are not well understood. However, the article also states that recent studies suggest that there is “no safe level of fine particulate matter and that even short-term exposures can reduce lung function and raise the risk of a heart attack.”

Sources: NASA Visualization Studio, NASA, Scientific American

About the Author
  • Tiffany grew up in Southern California, where she attended San Diego State University. She graduated with a degree in Biology with a marine emphasis, thanks to her love of the ocean and wildlife. With 13 years of science writing under her belt, she now works as a freelance writer in the Pacific Northwest.
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JUN 04, 2020 3:34 PM PDT

COVID-19 Lockdown Leads to Decreases in Outdoor Air Pollution, but Increases in Indoor Air Pollution

WRITTEN BY: Tiffany Dazet

With most of North America sheltering in place to prevent the further spread of COVID-19, it’s not surprising that there have been some improvements in outdoor air quality. According to an article from NASA Climate Change, there have been significant reductions in outdoor air pollution over several major metropolitan areas of the United States.

In early April, NASA reported a 30% drop in air pollution over the Northeast United States. In mid-May, NASA reported a 31% decrease in nitrogen dioxide over the Los Angeles basin in California. As restrictions continue to lift and life returns to normal, more reports of change in pollution levels are expected to emerge.

NASA reports that nitrogen dioxide, primarily emitted from burning fossil fuels, is a reliable indicator of changes in human activity. According to NASA, nitrogen dioxide is emitted from tailpipes while driving and smokestacks from electricity generation. NASA also reports that Sulfur dioxide is another pollutant that can indicate changes in anthropogenic activities, such as electricity generation, oil and gas extraction, and metal smelting.

However, Scientific American reports that because people are spending more time at home, they may be exposed to increased levels of air pollutants indoors. According to Scientific American, increasing cooking at home and the frequency of cleaning product-use can contaminate indoor air. The article reports that a study from earlier this year revealed that certain cooking methods, such as roasting vegetables in a gas oven, may generate an “extraordinarily high level” of fine particulate matter indoors. Additionally, gas stoves emit more particulate matter than electric, although electric stoves do produce particles as well.

Besides particulate matter and potentially toxic gases released by stoves, cleaning products are additional household hazards to consider during lockdown. Scientific American states that cleaning with bleach is a significant concern. By mixing bleach and water, hypochlorous acid is produced and can react with dirt and debris. Additionally, hypochlorous acid can react with other airborne particles and create toxins.

The article from Scientific American conveys that the health consequences of increased indoor pollution during lockdown are not well understood. However, the article also states that recent studies suggest that there is “no safe level of fine particulate matter and that even short-term exposures can reduce lung function and raise the risk of a heart attack.”

Sources: NASA Visualization Studio, NASA, Scientific American

About the Author
  • Tiffany grew up in Southern California, where she attended San Diego State University. She graduated with a degree in Biology with a marine emphasis, thanks to her love of the ocean and wildlife. With 13 years of science writing under her belt, she now works as a freelance writer in the Pacific Northwest.
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COVID-19 Lockdown Leads to Decreases in Outdoor Air Pollution, but Increases in Indoor Air Pollution

WRITTEN BY: Tiffany Dazet

With most of North America sheltering in place to prevent the further spread of COVID-19, it’s not surprising that there have been some improvements in outdoor air quality. According to an article from NASA Climate Change, there have been significant reductions in outdoor air pollution over several major metropolitan areas of the United States.

In early April, NASA reported a 30% drop in air pollution over the Northeast United States. In mid-May, NASA reported a 31% decrease in nitrogen dioxide over the Los Angeles basin in California. As restrictions continue to lift and life returns to normal, more reports of change in pollution levels are expected to emerge.

NASA reports that nitrogen dioxide, primarily emitted from burning fossil fuels, is a reliable indicator of changes in human activity. According to NASA, nitrogen dioxide is emitted from tailpipes while driving and smokestacks from electricity generation. NASA also reports that Sulfur dioxide is another pollutant that can indicate changes in anthropogenic activities, such as electricity generation, oil and gas extraction, and metal smelting.

However, Scientific American reports that because people are spending more time at home, they may be exposed to increased levels of air pollutants indoors. According to Scientific American, increasing cooking at home and the frequency of cleaning product-use can contaminate indoor air. The article reports that a study from earlier this year revealed that certain cooking methods, such as roasting vegetables in a gas oven, may generate an “extraordinarily high level” of fine particulate matter indoors. Additionally, gas stoves emit more particulate matter than electric, although electric stoves do produce particles as well.

Besides particulate matter and potentially toxic gases released by stoves, cleaning products are additional household hazards to consider during lockdown. Scientific American states that cleaning with bleach is a significant concern. By mixing bleach and water, hypochlorous acid is produced and can react with dirt and debris. Additionally, hypochlorous acid can react with other airborne particles and create toxins.

The article from Scientific American conveys that the health consequences of increased indoor pollution during lockdown are not well understood. However, the article also states that recent studies suggest that there is “no safe level of fine particulate matter and that even short-term exposures can reduce lung function and raise the risk of a heart attack.”

Sources: NASA Visualization Studio, NASA, Scientific American

About the Author
  • Tiffany grew up in Southern California, where she attended San Diego State University. She graduated with a degree in Biology with a marine emphasis, thanks to her love of the ocean and wildlife. With 13 years of science writing under her belt, she now works as a freelance writer in the Pacific Northwest.
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COVID-19 Lockdown Leads to Decreases in Outdoor Air Pollution, but Increases in Indoor Air Pollution | Earth And The Environment