DEC 05, 2017 1:00 PM PST

Can The Arrow of Time Be a Relative Concept?

WRITTEN BY: Daniel Duan

The arrow of time, also known as the asymmetry of time, dictates that time only flows one direction. An international team of researchers has conducted an experiment that shows that the arrow of time is a relative concept, not an absolute one.

The arrow of time. Credit: the Perimeter Institute For Theoretical Physics

They did not find a way to dial back the clock (and win a billion dollar lottery). But what they did is nothing short of amazing and clever. In a paper uploaded to the arXiv server, the team describe their experiment and its outcome, and also the implications of their findings.

The arrow of time can be defined by the second law of thermodynamics, which says that in an isolated system, entropy, or disorder, tends to increase with time. In their effort, the researchers found an exception to this rule that works in a way that doesn't violate the rules of physics as they have been defined.

The entanglement of particles has been all over the place in science news due to the increasing popularity of quantum physics. There is another lesser-known property of particles that is similar in nature, known as correlation

Correlation is a relationship of two or more subsystems. For example, two or more people carry an umbrella because of the forecast of possible rain. Entanglement is a particular kind of correlation, a strong one, which is not allowed in the classical model of physics. Like entanglement, particles or subsystems that are correlated share information, though the information does not constitute a strong bond.

To observe the so-called reversed arrow of time, researchers played with the temperature of the nuclei of a small molecule trichloromethane in a Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) environment. They made the hydrogen nucleus hotter than the carbon nucleus, and then measured the direction of heat flow. When the nuclei of the two atoms were uncorrelated, heat flowed from the hotter hydrogen nucleus to the colder carbon nucleus. But when the two were correlated with spins at -1/2, they found that the heat flowed backward the colder nucleus to the hot nucleus.

The spin number describes the angular momentum of an electron. An electron spins around an axis and has both angular momentum and orbital angular momentum. The spin number has both a magnitude (1/2) and direction (+ or -). Isotopes containing an odd number of protons and neutrons such as Hydrogen-1 and Carbon-13, which are in the trichloromethane molecule, have an intrinsic magnetic moment and angular momentum. Therefore, they can be manipulated with the magnetic field of NMR.

But why did the researchers believe that their observation did not violate the second law of thermodynamics? Because the law assumes that there are no correlations between particles in the system.

So no one is traveling back in time (at least not yet), and no classical physical laws is broken. But the discovery from this microscopic level experiment challenged the common understanding of time. As the researchers pointed out, the research “highlights the subtle interplay of quantum mechanics, thermodynamics and information theory”. They believed that the results revealed the limitations of the standard model of physics and the local application of the second law for systems that are correlated.

Entropy and the Arrow of Time. Credit: The Royal Institute

Source: phys.org

About the Author
  • Graduated with a bachelor degree in Pharmaceutical Science and a master degree in neuropharmacology, Daniel is a radiopharmaceutical and radiobiology expert based in Ottawa, Canada. With years of experience in biomedical R&D, Daniel is very into writing. He is constantly fascinated by what's happening in the world of science. He hopes to capture the public's interest and promote scientific literacy with his trending news articles. The recurring topics in his Chemistry & Physics trending news section include alternative energy, material science, theoretical physics, medical imaging, and green chemistry.
You May Also Like
FEB 23, 2021
Chemistry & Physics
Converting methane in natural gas into liquid methanol at room temperature
FEB 23, 2021
Converting methane in natural gas into liquid methanol at room temperature
New research detailed in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences describes a recent development ...
MAR 04, 2021
Chemistry & Physics
The magic vibrational powers of frog lungs
MAR 04, 2021
The magic vibrational powers of frog lungs
Ever tried picking someone up at a loud, crowded bar? It’s not easy – not only may they not hear your fabulo ...
MAR 24, 2021
Chemistry & Physics
Can we promote the hydrogen economy without fossil fuels?
MAR 24, 2021
Can we promote the hydrogen economy without fossil fuels?
New research published in Angewandte Chemie International Edition reports a novel approach to producing hydrogen su ...
APR 01, 2021
Chemistry & Physics
Analyzing nitrogen dioxide with deep learning
APR 01, 2021
Analyzing nitrogen dioxide with deep learning
Researchers from Penn State are looking to deep learning to act as a method for improving air quality predictions. The r ...
MAY 05, 2021
Chemistry & Physics
Chemical nose sniffs out DNA irregularities
MAY 05, 2021
Chemical nose sniffs out DNA irregularities
A new study published in the journal Nature Chemistry details the development of a chemical nose that can identify ...
JUN 07, 2021
Chemistry & Physics
Are compostable batteries on the horizon?
JUN 07, 2021
Are compostable batteries on the horizon?
Biodegradable batteries represent the holy grail of our current technological obstacles to achieving the transition to a ...
Loading Comments...