FEB 04, 2016 4:21 PM PST

Tall People Have Lower Risk of Cardiovascular Disease, Higher Risk of Cancer

WRITTEN BY: Kara Marker
Besides having on average larger feet than short people, a new study shows tall people are also more at risk for getting cancer and less at risk for developing cardiovascular disease and type II diabetes, a less obvious inclination.
 

In a new study published in The Lancet Diabetes and Endocrinology, a collaborative group of researchers from the Deutsches Zentrum fuer Diabetesforschung (DZD), the Institute for Diabetes Research and Metabolic Diseases of Helmholtz, the University of Tübingen (IDM), the German Institute of Human Nutrition in Potsdam (DIfE), and the Harvard School of Public Health and Medical School used epidemiological data to draw conclusions about the long-term health of tall people versus short people.
 
Scientists from this study explained that the certain predispositions to disease associated with tall people start during development in the womb with the nutritional health of the mother. Overnutrition with high-calorie foods dense in animal proteins in utero and after birth during early development supposedly provide a “lifelong programming” that increase the life risk of tall people developing cancer. Foods like:
  • Milk
  • Other dairy products
  • Other animal proteins
What is about a high-calorie diet that increases a person’s risk for getting cancer? Isn’t milk supposed to build strong bones and teeth? The scientists from this study believe that tall people develop increased sensitivity to insulin as well as have less fat in the liver as a result of their diet at an early age. While this insulin sensitivity gives tall people greater protection from cardiovascular disease and diabetes, it only increases the risk of cancer.
 
The risk of cancer from a high-calorie diet comes from the activation of the Insulin Growth Factor (IGF)-1/2 system, a network of binding proteins regulated by “multiple factors including growth factors, cytokines, lipoproteins, reactive oxygen species” (Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology). Although the exact mechanisms have not yet been determined, scientists believe that the connection between the IGF-1/2 system and increased risk of cancer centers on these growth factors stimulating abnormal cell growth.
 
Although many specific players in the relationship between tall people and cancer risk have yet to be identified, this study does speak an important message on prevention and awareness. Tall people should more often be targets for prevention, and diet is clearly more important in the development of chronic, non-communicable diseases than scientists previously thought.
 

Source: DZD
 
About the Author
  • I am a scientific journalist and enthusiast, especially in the realm of biomedicine. I am passionate about conveying the truth in scientific phenomena and subsequently improving health and public awareness. Sometimes scientific research needs a translator to effectively communicate the scientific jargon present in significant findings. I plan to be that translating communicator, and I hope to decrease the spread of misrepresented scientific phenomena! Check out my science blog: ScienceKara.com.
You May Also Like
OCT 01, 2020
Health & Medicine
Menopausal Women Find Relief in Cannabis
OCT 01, 2020
Menopausal Women Find Relief in Cannabis
A growing number of women may be using cannabis for managing menopause symptoms, evidence from  the Midlife Women V ...
OCT 07, 2020
Cancer
Delivering Cancer Drugs to Osteosarcoma with Nanoparticles
OCT 07, 2020
Delivering Cancer Drugs to Osteosarcoma with Nanoparticles
Over the years, cancer researchers have struggled not just with drug and diagnostic design, but with drug delivery. The ...
OCT 08, 2020
Cardiology
Omega-3 Enriched Chicken as a Fish Alternative for Omega-3 Fatty Acids
OCT 08, 2020
Omega-3 Enriched Chicken as a Fish Alternative for Omega-3 Fatty Acids
We have all seen those articles telling us to get more omega-3 fatty acids in our diet. Many studies point to these spec ...
OCT 05, 2020
Health & Medicine
Cannabis Chemotherapy Trial Shows Encouraging Phase II Results
OCT 05, 2020
Cannabis Chemotherapy Trial Shows Encouraging Phase II Results
Even with the best anti-nausea medications one in three patients receiving chemotherapy experiences vomiting, and about ...
OCT 05, 2020
Earth & The Environment
The rising concern of aerosol particles
OCT 05, 2020
The rising concern of aerosol particles
A study from Colorado State University scientists provides insight into the resiliency of aerosol particles, particles f ...
OCT 20, 2020
Cancer
Is your physical activity intense enough?
OCT 20, 2020
Is your physical activity intense enough?
Older adults with higher physical activity and lower sitting time have better overall physical and mental health, accord ...
Loading Comments...