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MAY 6, 2020

Forensic Sciences 2020

LabRoots is pleased to announce our 2nd Forensic Sciences Virtual Event on May 6, 2020. Join us for this free, one-day event on May 6th as we discuss DNA, chemistry, toxicology, digital forensics, and the important marginal area where science and medicine interact with the law.

This years event include the following tracks:

Forensic Research: From Evidence to Testimony

Advances and Challenges in Forensic Research

Analytical Strategy and Application of Analytical Methods in Forensic Toxicology and Pharmacology

Our virtual conference allows you to participate in a global setting with no travel or cost to you. The event will remain open 6 months from the date of the live event.  The webinars will be available for unlimited on-demand viewing.  This virtual conference also offers increased reach for the global microbiology community with a high degree of interaction through live-streaming video and chat sessions.

Like the 2019 conference, this event will be produced on our robust platform, allowing you to watch, learn and connect seamlessly across all desktop or mobile devices. Equipped with gamification and point system, you can now move around the entire event, earning points for a chance to win one of LabRoots' most popular T-shirts.


 

Call for Posters — Virtual poster sessions offer the opportunity to present data to a global audience via a PDF poster and video summary, and discuss results with interested colleagues through email. Plan now to have your poster included in the 2020 Forensic Sciences Virtual Event. Submission is free. Submit your abstract here.

Continuing Education  LabRoots is approved as a provider of continuing education programs in the clinical laboratory sciences by the ASCLS P.A.C.E. ® Program. By attending this event, you can earn 1 Continuing Education credit per presentation for a maximum of 30 credits.

Use #LRforensics to follow the conversation!


Speakers
  • Chia Professor, University of New Haven Chief Emeritus (ret.), Connecticut State Police Director, Research & Training Center
  • Toxicology Liaison and Senior Advisor, Office of the Director, National Institutes of Health, NIEHS (National Institute of Environmental Health Science), National Toxicology Program
  • Assistant Lab Director, NMS Labs
  • Senior Research Scientist, Center for Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity, Stanford University
  • Professor of Forensic Science, School of Forensic Science, Oklahoma State University Center for Health Sciences
  • Assistant Director, Henry C. Lee Institute of Forensic Science, Associate Professor, Forensic Geneticist, Henry C. Lee College of Criminal Justice & Forensic Sciences, University of New Haven
  • Associate Professor, Department of Entomology, Department of Osteopathic Medical Specialties, Ecology, Evolutionary Biology, and Behavior Program, Michigan State University
  • Assistant Professor, Forensic Science Program, University of Toronto
  • Research Scientist, Special Programs, National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Expert Working Group on Human Factors in Forensic DNA Interpretation
  • Associate Professor of Forensic Molecular Biology and Chair of the Department of Forensic Sciences, The George Washington University

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Posters

POSTER SUBMISSION GUIDELINES

Virtual poster sessions offer the opportunity to present data to a global audience via a PDF poster and video summary, and discuss results with interested colleagues through email. Posters should be submitted as a PowerPoint file. Presentations should incorporate illustrative materials such as tables, graphs, photographs, and large-print text. This content is not peer-reviewed. Submission is free.

If you are interested in sponsoring a Poster for this virtual event and generate leads, the cost is $250 and you can submit the poster at advertise@labroots.com.

SUBMIT YOUR ABSTRACT

Enter the following information to this Submission Form:

  • Poster Title
  • Your Name
  • Your Institution
  • Your Email
  • Abstract describing the poster


All submitted abstracts will be reviewed and decisions regarding acceptance will be made as abstracts are received. You will be notified within one week of receipt about acceptance. Further details and registration materials will be provided at that time. You do not have to be present in order to have a poster displayed. Only those abstracts approved by LabRoots may display posters at this event.

If accepted, you will also have the opportunity to record a 3-5 minute summary video for each poster. LabRoots will work with each individual to create these videos. Video links and email contact information will be included on each poster displayed.

Questions? Email Posters@LabRoots.com

LabRoots Policy

Agenda
  • Estimating the age of biological evidence recovered from a crime scene by assessing RNA degradation in the sample
    Estimating the age of biological evidence recovered from a crime scene by assessing RNA degradation in the sample
    Robert W. Allen, PhD
    Professor of Forensic Science, School of Forensic Science, Oklahoma State University Center for Health Sciences
  • Keynote Presentation: Pattern Evidence Reconstruction
    MAY 06, 2020 9:00 AM PDT
    Keynote Presentation: Pattern Evidence Reconstruction
    Henry C. Lee, PhD
    Chia Professor, University of New Haven Chief Emeritus (ret.), Connecticut State Police Director, Research & Training Center
  • Keynote Presentation: Complexities of characterizing mineral particle toxicity at the pulmonary interface
    MAY 06, 2020 7:30 AM PDT
    Keynote Presentation: Complexities of characterizing mineral particle toxicity at the pulmonary interface
    Christopher P. Weis, PhD, DABT
    Toxicology Liaison and Senior Advisor, Office of the Director, National Institutes of Health, NIEHS (National Institute of Environmental Health Science), National Toxicology Program
  • Deciphering the Necrobiome and Postmortem Microbiomes for Use in Forensics
    Deciphering the Necrobiome and Postmortem Microbiomes for Use in Forensics
    M. Eric Benbow, PhD, AAFS-F
    Associate Professor, Department of Entomology, Department of Osteopathic Medical Specialties, Ecology, Evolutionary Biology, and Behavior Program, Michigan State University
  • Forensic Anthropology At La Línea: Advances In Computational Methods For The Identification Of The U.S.-México Border Dead.
    Forensic Anthropology At La Línea: Advances In Computational Methods For The Identification Of The U.S.-México Border Dead.
    Bridget F.B. Algee-Hewitt, PhD
    Senior Research Scientist, Center for Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity, Stanford University
  • I'm biased, and I know it! What can we learn from cognitive bias research in forensic science?
    I'm biased, and I know it! What can we learn from cognitive bias research in forensic science?
    Niki Osborne, PhD
    Research Scientist, Special Programs, National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Expert Working Group on Human Factors in Forensic DNA Interpretation
  • Microhaplotypes: the next generation DNA marker
    Microhaplotypes: the next generation DNA marker
    Daniele Podini
    Associate Professor of Forensic Molecular Biology and Chair of the Department of Forensic Sciences, The George Washington University
  • New Relevance of Hydroxychloroquine and Chloroquine in Forensic Toxicology
    New Relevance of Hydroxychloroquine and Chloroquine in Forensic Toxicology
    Wendy R. Adams, PhD, F-ABFT
    Assistant Lab Director, NMS Labs
  • Probabilistic genotyping and the power of modern DNA technology: A case study in overturning a wrongful conviction for murder in Texas
    Probabilistic genotyping and the power of modern DNA technology: A case study in overturning a wrongful conviction for murder in Texas
    Angie Ambers, PhD
    Assistant Director, Henry C. Lee Institute of Forensic Science, Associate Professor, Forensic Geneticist, Henry C. Lee College of Criminal Justice & Forensic Sciences, University of New Haven
  • The use of massively parallel sequencing in Forensic DNA typing - what will the future hold?
    The use of massively parallel sequencing in Forensic DNA typing - what will the future hold?
    Nicole M.M. Novroski, PhD
    Assistant Professor, Forensic Science Program, University of Toronto
  • Advances and Challenges in Forensic Research
  • Deciphering the Necrobiome and Postmortem Microbiomes for Use in Forensics
    Deciphering the Necrobiome and Postmortem Microbiomes for Use in Forensics
    M. Eric Benbow, PhD, AAFS-F
    Associate Professor, Department of Entomology, Department of Osteopathic Medical Specialties, Ecology, Evolutionary Biology, and Behavior Program, Michigan State University
  • Forensic Anthropology At La Línea: Advances In Computational Methods For The Identification Of The U.S.-México Border Dead.
    Forensic Anthropology At La Línea: Advances In Computational Methods For The Identification Of The U.S.-México Border Dead.
    Bridget F.B. Algee-Hewitt, PhD
    Senior Research Scientist, Center for Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity, Stanford University
  • I'm biased, and I know it! What can we learn from cognitive bias research in forensic science?
    I'm biased, and I know it! What can we learn from cognitive bias research in forensic science?
    Niki Osborne, PhD
    Research Scientist, Special Programs, National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Expert Working Group on Human Factors in Forensic DNA Interpretation
  • The use of massively parallel sequencing in Forensic DNA typing - what will the future hold?
    The use of massively parallel sequencing in Forensic DNA typing - what will the future hold?
    Nicole M.M. Novroski, PhD
    Assistant Professor, Forensic Science Program, University of Toronto
  • Microhaplotypes: the next generation DNA marker
    Microhaplotypes: the next generation DNA marker
    Daniele Podini
    Associate Professor of Forensic Molecular Biology and Chair of the Department of Forensic Sciences, The George Washington University
  • Analytical Strategy and Application of Analytical Methods in Forensic Toxicology and Pharmacology
  • New Relevance of Hydroxychloroquine and Chloroquine in Forensic Toxicology
    New Relevance of Hydroxychloroquine and Chloroquine in Forensic Toxicology
    Wendy R. Adams, PhD, F-ABFT
    Assistant Lab Director, NMS Labs
  • Keynote Presentation: Complexities of characterizing mineral particle toxicity at the pulmonary interface
    MAY 06, 2020 7:30 AM PDT
    Keynote Presentation: Complexities of characterizing mineral particle toxicity at the pulmonary interface
    Christopher P. Weis, PhD, DABT
    Toxicology Liaison and Senior Advisor, Office of the Director, National Institutes of Health, NIEHS (National Institute of Environmental Health Science), National Toxicology Program
  • Forensic Research: From Evidence to Testimony
  • Probabilistic genotyping and the power of modern DNA technology: A case study in overturning a wrongful conviction for murder in Texas
    Probabilistic genotyping and the power of modern DNA technology: A case study in overturning a wrongful conviction for murder in Texas
    Angie Ambers, PhD
    Assistant Director, Henry C. Lee Institute of Forensic Science, Associate Professor, Forensic Geneticist, Henry C. Lee College of Criminal Justice & Forensic Sciences, University of New Haven
  • Keynote Presentation: Pattern Evidence Reconstruction
    MAY 06, 2020 9:00 AM PDT
    Keynote Presentation: Pattern Evidence Reconstruction
    Henry C. Lee, PhD
    Chia Professor, University of New Haven Chief Emeritus (ret.), Connecticut State Police Director, Research & Training Center
  • Estimating the age of biological evidence recovered from a crime scene by assessing RNA degradation in the sample
    Estimating the age of biological evidence recovered from a crime scene by assessing RNA degradation in the sample
    Robert W. Allen, PhD
    Professor of Forensic Science, School of Forensic Science, Oklahoma State University Center for Health Sciences
Speakers

  • Henry C. Lee, PhD
    Chia Professor, University of New Haven Chief Emeritus (ret.), Connecticut State Police Director, Research & Training Center
    Biography
      Dr. Henry C. Lee is one of the world's foremost forensic scientists. Dr. Lee's work has made him a landmark in modern-day criminal investigations. He has been a prominent player in many of the most challenging cases of the last 50 years. Dr. Lee has worked with law enforcement agencies in helping to solve more than 8000 cases. In recent years, his travels have taken him to England, Bosnia, Canada, China, Brunei, Bermuda, Germany, Singapore, Thailand, Middle East, South America and other locations around the world. Dr. Lee's testimony figured prominently in the O. J. Simpson, Jason Williams, Peterson, and Kennedy Smith Trials; and in convictions of the "Woodchipper" murderer as well as thousands of other murder cases. Dr. Lee has assisted local and state police in their investigations of other famous crimes, such as the murder of Jon Benet Ramsey in Boulder, Colorado, the 1993 suicide of White House Counsel Vincent Foster, the death of Chandra Levy, the kidnapping of Elizabeth Smart, and the reinvestigation of the Kennedy assassination. He was a consultant for more than 800 law enforcement agencies. Dr. Lee is currently the director of Forensic Research and Training Center and Distinguished Professor in Forensic Science of the University of New Haven. He was the Chief Emeritus for the Connecticut State Police during 2000-2010 and was the Commissioner of Public Safety for the State of Connecticut during 1998 to 2000 and has served as the state's Chief Criminalist from 1978 to 2000. Dr. Lee was the driving force in establishing a modern state police communication system, Community based police services sex offender and DNA databank, major crime investigation concepts and advanced forensic science services in Connecticut. In 1975, Dr. Lee joined the University of New Haven, where he created the school's Forensic Sciences program. He has also taught as a professor at more than a dozen universities, law schools, and medical schools. Though challenged with the demands on his time, Dr. Lee still lectures throughout the country and world to police, Universities and civic organizations. Dr. Lee has authored hundreds of articles in professional journals and has co-authored more than 40 books, covering the areas, such as; DNA, Fingerprints, Trace Evidence, Crime Scene Investigation and Crime Scene Reconstruction. He is the author of some best sellers, such as Famous Crimes Revisited, Cracking Cases: the science of solving crimes, Blood Evidence, and Cracking More Cases. In addition, his textbooks such as Forensic Science, Physical Evidence and Henry Lee's Crime Scene Handbook have been widely adopted in medical legal and forensic professions. He has appeared in many TV shows and movies. His new television series, Trace Evidence - Dr. Henry Lee File has received high ratings and has been broadcasted around the world. Dr. Lee has been the recipient of numerous medals and awards, including the 1996 Medal of Justice from the Justice Foundation, and the 1998 Lifetime Achievement Award from the Science and Engineer Association. He has also been the recipient of the Distinguished Criminalist Award from the American Academy of Forensic Sciences (AAFS); the J. Donero Award from the International Association of Identification and in 1992 was elected a distinguished Fellow of the AAFS. He has also received the Lifetime Achievement Award from the American College of Forensic Examiners (ACFE) in 2000, Medal of Honor by the Ellis Island Foundation in 2004, Congressional Recognition for Outstanding services by the US Congress in 2004, Presidential Medal of Honor by the President of Croatia in 2005, Medal of Service from the Ministry of Interior, Taiwan, ROC in 2006, and Gusi Peace Award from the Philippines in 2008. Dr. Lee was born in China in 1938 and raised up in Taiwan. Dr. Lee first worked for the Taipei Police Department, attaining the rank of Captain. Dr. Lee came to the United States in 1965, and he earned his B.S. in Forensic Science from John Jay College in 1972. Dr. Lee continued his studies in biochemistry at NYU where he earned his Master's Degree in 1974 and his Ph.D. in 1975. He has also received special training from the FBI Academy, ATF, RCMP, and other organizations. He is a recipient of 20 Honorary degrees: Doctorate Degrees of Science from the University of New Haven, University of Connecticut, Honorary Doctorate of Law from Roger Williams Law School, Mitchell College, American International University and Taiwan Scientific Technology University, Honorary Doctorate Degree in Humane Letters from the University of Bridgeport, St. Joseph College, Armstrong University, in recognition of his contributions to Law and Science.
    • Christopher P. Weis, PhD, DABT
      Toxicology Liaison and Senior Advisor, Office of the Director, National Institutes of Health, NIEHS (National Institute of Environmental Health Science), National Toxicology Program
      Biography
        Dr. Christopher Weis serves as Senior Advisor and Toxicology Liaison for the Director of the National Institute of Environmental Health Science (NIEHS), at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in Bethesda, Maryland. NIH is an agency of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Chris represents the Director of NIEHS and the National Toxicology Program (NTP) on national and international committees, task forces and ad hoc working groups. Prior to joining NIEHS in August 2010, Chris served as the senior toxicologist for USEPA's Office of Criminal Enforcement, Forensics and Training at the National Enforcement Investigations Center in Denver, CO. He has more than 30 years of experience characterizing environmental exposures and hazards for chemical, biological, nuclear, radiological and explosive (CBNRE) materials. Chris completed his Ph.D. in toxicology and medical physiology at Michigan State University in 1987 and was awarded two fellowships at the University of Virginia, Department of Molecular Physiology and Biological Physics. Chris retired as president of the American Board of Toxicology in 2018.
      • Wendy R. Adams, PhD, F-ABFT
        Assistant Lab Director, NMS Labs
        Biography
          Wendy Adams is an Assistant Laboratory Director with NMS Labs in Willow Grove, Pennsylvania. She earned her Ph.D. in Pharmacology and Toxicology from Duquesne University in 2007. Her work experience includes Synthetic Chemistry at Systems Integrated Drug Discovery Co., Forensic Chemistry at the Allegheny County Coroner's Office and Analytical Chemistry in the GC/MS Screening Department at NMS Labs. She currently directs diverse departments covering drugs of abuse by GC/MS and LC-MS/MS, and screening by LC/TOF. Dr. Adams is a Fellow member of the American Board of Forensic Toxicology. She serves as a voting member of the American Academy of Forensic Sciences Standards Board and the Organizational Scientific Area Committee (OSAC) in the subdiscipline of Forensic Toxicology. Her research interests include preanalytical variability, regional trends in drug use and adverse drug interactions.
        • Bridget F.B. Algee-Hewitt, PhD
          Senior Research Scientist, Center for Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity, Stanford University
          Biography
            Bridget FB Algee-Hewitt, PhD, is a broadly trained anthropologist, who studies how biological - skeletal and genetic - and cultural traits vary among contemporary peoples, across space and through time. As a forensic scientist, she develops new computational methods, using machine learning/AI and geographic mapping algorithms, and hands-on DNA and osteology laboratory approaches to improve estimation of the personal identity parameters - like sex, ancestry, stature, and age - that are essential components of the biological profile used in the identification of unknown human remains. Her social justice work focuses on migration, displacement, poverty, and violence in Latin America, addressing, in particular, the crisis of migrant deaths along the US-México border. As an advocate for immigrant rights globally, she draws upon her community-engaged research with refugee groups to inform her expert testimony for asylum petitions and to support her recommendations for policy development and reform.
          • Robert W. Allen, PhD
            Professor of Forensic Science, School of Forensic Science, Oklahoma State University Center for Health Sciences
            Biography
              Received my B.S. In Zoology from University of Tulsa, Tulsa, OK Received my PhD in Cell Biology from Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN Did Post Graduate research at Scripps Clinic and Research Foundation, La Jolla, CA Have been on the faculty at OSU since 2001. In addition to faculty appointment, I direct the Human Identity Laboratory at OSU that performed DNA typing in forensic and kinship cases. My interest in forensic genetics grew out of my ability to work with DNA during the 1980s when the molecular tools became available to visualize variability in the human genome. Being able to visualize variability had immediate application in human identification in areas of crime scene investigation and family relatedness testing, both of which were very large areas of daily life. I found great satisfaction in using my skills to contribute to solving criminal cases and to confirming alleged family relationships for all the reasons questions in families arise. This included the identification of unidentified human remains, an area that has grown substantially as conflicts around the world have expanded. I got interested in trying to develop methods useful for estimating the age of biological evidence because such questions can be very important in investigations of when someone died, or whether a sample recovered from a crime scene was deposited at the scene at the time the crime occurred, or, was it already there? For the past 6 years, my lab has been working on this topic and we have developed methods that we think will be valuable in answering the question of "when" as it relates to the "who, what, where, and when" of criminal investigations.
            • Angie Ambers, PhD
              Assistant Director, Henry C. Lee Institute of Forensic Science, Associate Professor, Forensic Geneticist, Henry C. Lee College of Criminal Justice & Forensic Sciences, University of New Haven
              Biography
                Dr. Angie Ambers is Assistant Director of the Henry C. Lee Institute of Forensic Science, a world-class institute that specializes in interdisciplinary research, training, testing, casework consulting, and education in forensic science. She also holds an Associate Professor appointment in the Henry C. Lee College of Criminal Justice and Forensic Sciences at the University of New Haven, teaching basic and advanced forensic DNA analysis methods. She has a Ph.D. in molecular biology (with emphasis in forensic genetics and human identification) as well as master's degrees both in forensic genetics and in criminology. Dr. Ambers is an active cold case consultant, an advocate of post-conviction DNA testing, and an educator/advisor on DNA testing or re-testing of old, degraded, or challenging evidentiary samples. Dr. Ambers specializes in genetic characterization and identification of contemporary, historical, and archaeological human skeletal remains. Her casework has involved DNA testing of an American Civil War guerrilla scout, Finnish World War II soldiers, unidentified late-19th century skeletal remains discovered by a construction crew (Deadwood, SD), Special Operations soldiers killed during the 1974 Turkish invasion of Cyprus, skeletal remains exhumed from Prague Castle (Czech Republic), soldiers from the Seven Years' War (1756-1763), bones of a Jesse James' gang member, remains associated with the French explorer La Salle's last expedition, and Spanish Royal bones (Kings of Aragon). She has traveled to India to train scientists from various Indian states and the Maldives Police Service on the processing of bone samples in forensic DNA casework. Her casework and research has been published in various peer-reviewed journals [Forensic Science International: Genetics (FSI: Genetics), International Journal of Legal Medicine, Legal Medicine, BMC Genomics, Croatian Medical Journal, The Journal of Heredity] and has received press in numerous local and national newspapers, including The Washington Times. In addition to skeletal remains cases and research, Dr. Ambers was Project Lead on a U.S. State Department grant (2017-2018) to combat human trafficking in Central America through the application of forensics. She traveled to three Northern Triangle countries (Guatemala, El Salvador, Honduras) to perform gap assessments of government laboratories and train personnel in forensic DNA analysis. In addition, she was part of a consortium to help these countries develop/maintain forensic DNA databases to assist in identification of missing persons related to human trafficking.
              • M. Eric Benbow, PhD, AAFS-F
                Associate Professor, Department of Entomology, Department of Osteopathic Medical Specialties, Ecology, Evolutionary Biology, and Behavior Program, Michigan State University
                Biography
                  Dr. Benbow joined the faculty of at Michigan State University in 2014 with a joint appointment in the Department of Department of Entomology and Department Osteopathic Medical Specialties. From 2008 - 2013 he was an assistant professor at the University of Dayton. His research program has developed around basic and applied insect and microbial ecology, with a history of studying disease in West Africa and more recent activities in building partnerships for food security in Malawi. He is the author or coauthor of over 140 peer-reviewed journal articles, 29 book chapters, three edited books and has received funding through NIH, NSF, NIJ, USDA, USGS, and USFS. Dr. Benbow has also served on three National Academy of Science, Engineering and Medicine appointed committees and is a regularly invited speaker to many international venues as a result of interactions with national and international scientists. He is a Fellow of the American Academy of Forensic Sciences and former president of the North American Forensic Entomology Association. Dr. Benbow is a community and disease ecologist, studying how complex communities (e.g., aquatic or carrion insects or microbes) contribute to ecological systems and can understanding these communities can be used in various applications in medicine, disease and forensics. One of the largest community ecology studies related to human health has been the Human Microbiome Project that showed much of the human body is composed of a wide diversity of prokaryotic cells and that these communities have significant importance to human health. Using the technological advances that came with the Human Microbiome Project, Dr. Benbow and colleagues have partnered with a medical examiner office to survey the postmortem microbiomes during routine autopsies and death investigations. The goal of this collaborative work is to determine how postmortem microbiomes can be used to make estimates of the postmortem interval and manner/cause of death. In addition to this work, Dr. Benbow's lab also does basic forensic research on how aquatic microbiomes can be used to estimate postmortem submersion intervals; consults for death investigations; and studies how insects and microbial communities interact in ways that could affect evidence during investigations. In addition to forensic research, Dr. Benbow's lab asks three general questions: 1) Is insect fitness influenced by the community of microbes living in or on them? 2) What are the ecological interactions of insects with the microbial communities associated with their habitat or food resources? and, 3) How can this information be used to inform resources management, human health and forensics? With a joint appointment in the College of Osteopathic Medicine, his lab seeks to answer these insect-microbe questions for translation into human health applications. Given the rich history of research in insect-microbe interactions that has focused on vectoring pathogens and co-evolved symbionts, coupled with the advanced ability to identify culturable and non-culturable bacteria using high throughput sequencing, a new generation of inquiry into the importance of the insect microbiome and their interactions in nature has tremendous potential for insect science. It is within this realm of inquiry where his students test explicit hypotheses at the individual, population and community levels to better understand the importance of insect-microbe interactions to the ecology and evolution of carrion, aquatic biology, forensics and disease systems. The research centers on the applied ecology of insect-microbial interactions within three systems: carrion decomposition (and forensics), aquatic ecological networks and disease systems.
                • Nicole M.M. Novroski, PhD
                  Assistant Professor, Forensic Science Program, University of Toronto
                  Biography
                    Dr. Nicole Novroski is an Assistant Professor and Forensic Geneticist within the Forensic Science Program at the University of Toronto. She is native to Canada, where she completed her Bachelor's Degree in Forensic Science and Biology at the University of Toronto (where she is now a tenure-stream faculty member). Dr. Novroski's graduate work includes a Masters degree from the University at Albany, SUNY in Forensic Molecular Biology, where she interned at the Minnesota Bureau of Criminal Apprehension in St. Paul. Following graduation in 2011, she focused on casework at the NYC Office of Chief Medical Examiner Department of Forensic Biology as a Criminalist and left in 2013 to pursue a doctoral degree at the University of North Texas Health Science Center. She earned her PhD in 2018 under the guidance of Dr. Bruce Budowle, where she focused on a novel panel of highly informative STR markers for enhanced DNA mixture deconvolution. She currently specializes in using massively parallel sequencing (MPS; also known as next-generation sequencing) coupled with novel approaches and methodologies for forensic human identity testing. Her continued focus is in the exploration of previously uncharacterized genetic markers for improved DNA mixture de-convolution. Dr. Novroski's research also includes the characterization of sequence variation for human identity markers, and in the generation of sequence-based allele frequencies (and other population studies) for forensic applications worldwide. For more information about Dr. Novroski's growing lab, please visit www.nicolenovroski.com.
                  • Niki Osborne, PhD
                    Research Scientist, Special Programs, National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Expert Working Group on Human Factors in Forensic DNA Interpretation
                    Biography
                      Dr Osborne specializes in understanding and improving human factors issues in forensic evidence interpretation and presentation. Her primary research focus has been on the role of contextual information and potential for cognitive and contextual bias and in bloodstain pattern analysis. From this research, she has developed practical methods to manage contextual information for bloodstain pattern analysis in the laboratory and at the crime scene. Dr Osborne has research and teaching experience across many forensic disciplines, including latent print examination, bitemark analysis, and handwriting examination. She is currently contracted to the National Institute of Standards and Technology to support management of the Expert Working Group on Human Factors in Forensic DNA Interpretation. She also facilitates workshops around the world on cognitive bias and contextual information management in forensic science through her sole tradership - Human Factors Training and Consultancy.
                    • Daniele Podini
                      Associate Professor of Forensic Molecular Biology and Chair of the Department of Forensic Sciences, The George Washington University
                      Biography
                        Prof. Podini is Associate Professor of Forensic Molecular Biology and Chair of the Department of Forensic Sciences at The George Washington University. He previously served as the Assistant Chief of the Biology Section of the Scientific Department of the Carabinieri - Italian military Armed Force. Later he created and directed the Forensic Section of Genoma, a private molecular biology laboratory in Rome. He consulted with laboratories in Italy, Turkey, Albania, Tunisia, and Algeria to aid in the establishment of Molecular Genetic Sections, and the development of specific forensic capabilities. The research conducted in his lab ranges from developing assays to infer biogeographic ancestry and physical traits, to working on high throughput detection of sperm cells from sexual assault evidence, and from obtaining DNA from fired cartage cases to developing methods to enhance DNA mixture deconvolution with the most recent DNA sequencing technology available.
                      C.E. Credits

                      The speakers below have been approved for Continuing Education Credits. To redeem your credits, locate the presentation you watched and click on the CE buttons for further direction. For more general information regarding continuing education, the processes to receive credits, and the accreditation bodies, Click here


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                      • To learn more about how the virtual event works for attendees, download the Attendee Guide (PDF).

                      Virtual Event and Webinar Support:

                      Continuing Education (CME/CE) Support

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